HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Simple Favor, A
Death of Superman, The
Snake Outta Compton
House Where Evil Dwells, The
Eyes of Orson Welles, The
Blindspotting
Predator, The
Shirkers
Human Experiments
Hush...Hush, Sweet Charlotte
Occupation
Intruder
Beast
What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?
King of Thieves
Unfriended: Dark Web
Blood Fest
Visit to a Small Planet
12th Man, The
Laura
Hotel Artemis
Dogman
Zama
City on Fire
Bird Box
Nico, 1988
BlacKkKlansman
Panique
Happy New Year, Colin Burstead
Accident Man
   
 
Newest Articles
No, THIS Must Be the Place: True Stories on Blu-ray
Alf Garnett's Life After Death: Till Death... and The Thoughts of Chairman Alf on DVD
Balance of Power: Harold Pinter at the BBC on DVD
Strange Days 2: The Second Science Fiction Weirdness Wave
Strange Days: When Science Fiction Went Weird
Ha Ha Haaargh: Interview With Camp Death III in 2D! Director Matt Frame
Phone Freak: When a Stranger Calls on Blu-ray
A Name to Conjure With: David Nixon's Magic Box on DVD
Which 1950s Sci-Fi was Scariest? Invaders from Mars vs The Blob
The Empire Strikes Back: Khartoum vs Carry On Up the Khyber
Stan and Ollie's Final Folly: Atoll K on Blu-ray
The Big Grapple: Escape from New York and Its Influence
The Conquest of Everett: The Kenny Everett Video Show on DVD
Bout for the Count: Hammer's Dracula in the 1970s
Nopes from a Small Island: Mistreatment of American Stars in British Films
   
 
  Man From London, The A case of NoirBuy this film here.
Year: 2007
Director: Béla Tarr
Stars: Miroslav Krobot, Tilda Swinton, Ági Szirtes, János Derzsi, Erika Bók
Genre: Drama
Rating:  4 (from 1 vote)
Review: San Francisco International Film Festival 2008 screening

It’s an odd case when the first 12 or so minutes of a film contains almost no audible conversation. True, good film often relies on visual elements rather than chit chat to create an atmosphere and set the mood but The Man From London takes its sparse dialogue and moody cinematography and attempts maintain this unusual pace for over two hours in the noir-like drama from Béla Tarr (Werckmeister Harmonies) with only moderate success.

Based on a pulp fiction story by Belgian writer Georges Simenon, the film tracks Maloin (Miroslav Krobot) a switchman at a seaside railroad station who witnesses a robbery and murder. The grim antihero absconds with the satchel of British pounds which begins his slow mental and physical descent. With his newfound riches, he forces his daughter to quit her job, and then he purchases an expensive fur for her both of which only leads to a robust argument with his intense wife Camélia (Tilda Swinton). He becomes more disturbed and less rational with each scene. Not the typical noir, the film deals with Maloin’s slow descent while a disciplined detective methodically attempts to solve this case of robbery turned murder.

Strangers lurking about, curious characters, a suitcase full of cash, dark and foggy settings, criminal cover ups and a distinct detective might spell a direct hit for any noir film. Tarr creates not so much a whodunit but more of a “whydoneit.” The why becomes as clear as London evening. A film can only sustain so long on endless tracking shots and atmospheric scenery. Here, the characters’ motivations and depth offer only a backdrop to the setting. Tarr uses textured shots to create facial emotion, that gives the citizenry some complexity but it only takes the journey so far. He leaves characters and circumstances either incomplete or downright confusing. One viewer left saying that this film exemplified one of Tarr’s most accessible films which to the casual noir lover might cause them to choke on the atmosphere that engulfs this darkly unfulfilling film.
Reviewer: Keith Rockmael

 

This review has been viewed 2623 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Stately Wayne Manor
George White
Paul Smith
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Aseels Almasi
Rashed Ali
   

 

Last Updated: