HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Bruce Lee & I
Doraemon The Movie: Nobita's Dinosaur
Once Upon a Time... in Hollywood
Invasion Planet Earth
Ferdinand
Buddhist Spell, The
Steel and Lace
Reivers, The
Angel Has Fallen
I Lost My Body
At First Light
Free Ride
Crawl
Transit
Blank Check
Mad Monk, The
Wind, The
Holly and the Ivy, The
Atlantique
Now, Voyager
Wolf's Call, The
Nostalghia
Nightingale, The
Eighth Grade
Irishman, The
Betrayed
Lords of Chaos
Operation Petticoat
Dead Don't Die, The
On the Waterfront
Last Faust, The
Moonlighting
Art of Self-Defense, The
Ironweed
Booksmart
Prisoners
Beach Bum, The
Kill Ben Lyk
Into the Mirror
Support the Girls
   
 
Newest Articles
Memories Are Made of This: La Jetee and Sans Soleil on Blu-ray
Step Back in Time: The Amazing Mr. Blunden on Blu-ray
Crazy Cats and Kittens: What's New Pussycat on Blu-ray
No Place Like Home Guard: Dad's Army - The Lost Episodes on Blu-ray
A Real-Life Pixie: A Tribute to Michael J. Pollard in Four Roles
We're All In This Together: The Halfway House on Blu-ray
Please Yourselves: Frankie Howerd and The House in Nightmare Park on Blu-ray
Cleesed Off: Clockwise on Blu-ray
Sorry I Missed You: Les Demoiselles de Rochefort on Blu-ray
Silliest of the Silly: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 1 on Blu-ray
Protest Songs: Hair on Blu-ray
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
   
 
  Death of a Corrupt Man Delon goes gunning for government corruptionBuy this film here.
Year: 1977
Director: Georges Lautner
Stars: Alain Delon, Ornella Muti, Stéphane Audran, Mireille Darc, Maurice Ronet, Michel Aumont, Klaus Kinski
Genre: Drama, Action, Thriller
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: Philippe (Maurice Ronet), a corrupt politician, is being blackmailed by the mysterious Serrano, who keeps a diary full of juicy details on several of France’s most prominent figures. When Serrano is murdered, Philippe panics and goes for help from his best friend Xavier (Alain Delon). Xavier provides Philippe with an alibi, covering his whereabouts on the night of the crime, and is entrusted with Serrano’s diary. Philippe is killed, alongside several other suspects, as sinister forces begin liquidating anyone involved in the Serrano affair. A host of gangsters, corrupt cops, and hitmen are after the diary, but Xavier is an ice-cool, super-skilled, ex-legionnaire. He outshoots, outruns and outfoxes the bad guys, and follows a trail leading to a femme fatale (Ornella Muti), Philippe’s drunken wife (Stéphane Audran), a homosexual businessman (Klaus Kinski), and eventually, the real killer.

Produced by Delon, this is one of the French superstar’s finest vehicles, a Gallic cousin to such conspiracy thrillers as The Parallax View (1974) and Three Days of the Condor (1975). One could argue it’s superior to either, since instead of vague conspiracy fantasies concocted by ambiguous bogeymen, this is a pointed attack upon government corruption and politics being conducted in Mafia style. However, some critics castigated the film as too reflective of Delon’s right-wing views, a shallow riposte to more ambitious, left-wing thrillers like Yves Boisset’s Le Juge Fayard Dit ‘Le Sheriff’ and Pierre Granier-Deferre’s Adieu, Poulet (1975) (which, like Death of a Corrupt Man was adapted from a novel by Jean Laborde).

Whatever your take on its political stance, there is no denying it is a cracking thriller. Lautner punctuates the film with tense confrontations and brutal violence, and orchestrates one, magnificently sustained car chase. Master cinematographer Henri Decae makes inspired use of chiaroscuro to convey a palpable atmosphere of menace and dread. This being a Delon production, our hero gets to tangle with no less than three Euro beauties: sultry Ornella Muti, slinky Mireille Darc, and sly Stéphane Audran. Muti makes a striking, tragic heroine, but Darc and Audran are rather wasted in nondescript roles. Klaus Kinski fares considerably better, in a small but – for him – comparatively sympathetic part.

Centre of it all remains Alain Delon, commanding the screen with another variation on his “indestructible charmer” persona, established way back in Jean-Pierre Melville’s Le Samurai (1967). Less vulnerable than characters played by Warren Beatty and Robert Redford in similar thrillers, Delon is more a righteous superhero, standing up for the underdog and socking it to the corrupt power brokers in city hall. We wouldn’t want it any other way.

Reviewer: Andrew Pragasam

 

This review has been viewed 4247 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
Enoch Sneed
Paul Smith
  Rachel Franke
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: