HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Three Musketeers in Cavalier Boots
Hunter's Prayer, The
Country
Absolution
Rough Draft, A
Battle of the Godfathers
Lu Over the Wall
She's Funny That Way
Vox Lux
Aftermath, The
Five Fingers for Marseilles
Jupiter's Moon
Favourite, The
Mysteries of the Gods
Coming Home
De Sade
Patti Cake$
Hellbound
Final Destination 2
Romance
Bros: After the Screaming Stops
Cockleshell Heroes, The
Mule, The
Sunday in the Country
Nutcracker Fantasy
Spellcaster
Hipsters
Executive Action
Captain Marvel
Zombie Girl
Can You Ever Forgive Me?
Rhinoceros
Monkey King 3, The
Adventurers, The
Stripped to Kill
Daughter of Dr. Jekyll
Aladdin's Magic Lamp
Christopher Robin
Hole in the Ground, The
Daniel
   
 
Newest Articles
Wondrous Women: Supergirl vs Captain Marvel
Things Have Changed: Films You'd Be Insane to Make Now
The Hole in the Ground: Director Lee Cronin Interview
She's Missing: Director Alexandra McGuinness Interview
Woo's the Boss: Last Hurrah for Chivalry & Hand of Death on Blu-ray
Get Ahead in Showbiz: Expresso Bongo and It's All Happening
Outer Space and Outta Sight: Gonks Go Beat on Blu-ray
Tucked: The Derren Nesbitt Interview
Locomotion Pictures: The Best of British Transport Films on Blu-ray
Roman Scandals: Extreme Visions from Ancient Rome
Spider-Wrong and Spider-Right: The Dragon's Challenge and Into the Spider-Verse
Monster Dog: Cujo on Blu-ray
For Christ's Sake: Jesus Christ Superstar and The Last Temptation of Christ
Not In Front of the Children: Inappropriate Kids Movies
Deeper into Ozploitation: Next of Kin and Fair Game
   
 
  Weird Woman Voodoo DollBuy this film here.
Year: 1944
Director: Reginald Le Borg
Stars: Lon Chaney Jr, Anne Gwynne, Evelyn Ankers, Ralph Morgan, Elisabeth Risdon, Lois Collier, Harry Hayden, Elizabeth Russell, Phil Brown, Kay Harding
Genre: Horror, Thriller
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: It is a dark and stormy night, and Paula Reed (Anne Gwynne), the young wife of university professor Norman Reed (Lon Chaney Jr) is hurrying home through a high wind - unbeknownst to her husband, who thinks she is asleep in bed. What has she been doing? Evelyn Sawtell (Elizabeth Russell), wife of another academic on the grounds, spots Paula and telephones Norman to see if she is all right, but Norman thinks she is mistaken, and goes to check on his wife. Sure enough, she is in bed, but he notices mud on her shoes - could this all be something to do with her voodoo past on a Pacific island?

You can tell this is one of the Inner Sanctum series of mysteries, and not only because there's a disembodied head floating in a glass sphere on a conference table introducing the film by talking about murder. No, if it wasn't for that you could tell because this was about a borderline horror-esque hour of Lon Chaney Jr being harrassed and looking troubled, as all the Inner Sanctum films were. This one was scripted by Brenda Weisberg from the novel Conjure Wife by Fritz Leiber, and if that sounds familiar, well, perhaps you've read it, or perhaps you've seen the more famous British adaptation called Night of the Eagle from the 1960s.

Which is best? Well, the British film probably, but that's not to say the American version is without interest. It does tend to eschew the supernatural explanation after spending almost all of the running time relying on it for thrills, but is fairly enjoyable nonetheless. You do have to accept that Chaney is irresistable to women, and a "mental giant" as one character refers to him, but that's part of the fun. The problems for Norman start when he brings home Paula, who is as superstitious as he is rational, and one of the college staff who had his eye on him, Ilona (Evelyn Ankers) suffers a fit of jealousy and contrives to turn everyone against him - and his new wife.

Ankers manifestly relishes the chance to play the bitchy, manipulative Ilona, and she is the best thing in the picture. Actually, for a while Chaney seems like a supporting player in his own film as the plot concerns itself with Paula's anxiety and voodoo practices and Ilona's planting of the seeds of Norman's destruction in the minds of the others. It certainly takes Norman a while to cotton on, and he foolhardily destroys Paula's witchcraft accoutrements which spells the beginning of his downfall, including a suicide blamed on him and a possible murder conviction to boot. The rational angle, which Norman so heavily conforms to, takes a beating until Ilona's comeuppance, but they can't resist an "Ah! Maybe there was something to it after all!" ending. One of the better Inner Sanctums, it's hokey but amusing.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 3448 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
  Desbris M
Paul Shrimpton
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
  Derrick Smith
Darren Jones
   

 

Last Updated: