HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Western Stars
League of Gentlemen, The
Higher Power
Shinsengumi
IT Chapter Two
Rich Kids
Arena
Glory Guys, The
Serial Killer's Guide to Life, A
Lovers and Other Strangers
Shiny Shrimps, The
Good Woman is Hard to Find, A
Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark
Doctor at Sea
Spear
Death Cheaters
Wild Rose
Streetwalkin'
Mystify: Michael Hutchence
Devil's Playground, The
Cleanin' Up the Town: Remembering Ghostbusters
Hustlers
Mega Time Squad
Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker
Souvenir, The
Birds of Passage
Ma
Woman at War
Happy as Lazzaro
Mickey's Christmas Carol
Marriage Story
Santa Claus is a Bastard
Star, The
Tom & Jerry: A Nutcracker Tale
Shadow
Christmas Carol, A
Legend of the Demon Cat
Adventures of Sinbad, The
Wounds
Love & Peace
   
 
Newest Articles
Bash Street Kid: Cosh Boy on Blu-ray
Seeing is Believing: Being There on Blu-ray
Top Thirty Best (and Ten Worst) Films of the 2010s by Andrew Pragasam
Top of the Tens: The Best Films of the Decade by Graeme Clark
Terrorvision: A Ghost Story for Christmas in the 1970s
Memories Are Made of This: La Jetee and Sans Soleil on Blu-ray
Step Back in Time: The Amazing Mr. Blunden on Blu-ray
Crazy Cats and Kittens: What's New Pussycat on Blu-ray
No Place Like Home Guard: Dad's Army - The Lost Episodes on Blu-ray
A Real-Life Pixie: A Tribute to Michael J. Pollard in Four Roles
We're All In This Together: The Halfway House on Blu-ray
Please Yourselves: Frankie Howerd and The House in Nightmare Park on Blu-ray
Cleesed Off: Clockwise on Blu-ray
Sorry I Missed You: Les Demoiselles de Rochefort on Blu-ray
Silliest of the Silly: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 1 on Blu-ray
Protest Songs: Hair on Blu-ray
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
   
 
  Class of 1984 Problem PupilsBuy this film here.
Year: 1982
Director: Mark L. Lester
Stars: Perry King, Merrie Lynn Ross, Timothy Van Patten, Roddy McDowall, Stefan Arngrim, Michael J. Fox, Keith Knight, Lisa Langlois, Neil Clifford, Al Waxman, Erin Noble, David Gardner, Steve Pernie, Robert Reece, Joseph Kelly, Elva Mai Hoover, Vincent Abbatino
Genre: Thriller, Trash
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: The time is the near future and it's the first day of his new job for music teacher Andy Norris (Perry King), but the inner city school is a lot tougher than what he's used to. Once he arrives, he gets talking to veteran biology teacher Terry Corrigan (Roddy McDowall) and can't help but ask about the handgun he has noticed he carries. Corrigan replies vaguely, but Norris gets the idea that he is in for a rough experience when he sees the metal detectors and security guards at the school doors. Visiting the principal, he is given his schedule, but put out that he's expected to patrol the corridors during his free periods, although he doesn't know the half of it...

Remember The Blackboard Jungle and the way it was one of the films that ushered in the juvenile delinquent movies of the nineteen-fifties? Well Class of 1984 had a similar effect on the eighties, cashing in on fears that schools were becoming more unlawful, the difference being that in the fifties, Glenn Ford didn't hunt down the delinquents through the halls of learning with a view to bumping them off when he's pushed too far. This was not so much a commentary on a social problem than an exploitation flick designed to sensationalise its subject matter.

Norris's nemesis is Stegman (Timothy Van Patten with big hair), who gatecrashes the music lesson with his unlovely gang and causes a measure of disruption before being persuaded to leave. That's not the end of it, however, as Stegman decides he really doesn't like the firm but reasonable (at this point) teacher, and a game of tit for tat is what builds up throughout the running time, with Stegman going that bit too far in his determination to get his own back. Spraying fake blood in Norris's face, or blowing up his car is second nature to this tearaway.

Naturally, the police can do nothing, even when Stegman is caught selling drugs to his fellow pupils in the bathroom - there's not enough evidence, you see. A lot of teeth-gritting ensues, with a hefty dose of "go ahead, I dare ya!" posturing, but there's an absurd item of symoblism when one drugged pupil (thanks to Stegman) climbs a flagpole and falls to his death wrapped in the American flag (although this is a Canadian film). So the good kids are being sacrificed by the bad guys, not only their education but their lives as well. What's the solution?

Class of 1984 posits a reactionary one that appeals to the worst aspects of the audience's character - Stegman's gang even attacks little Michael J. Fox at one point. Fight violence with violence is the answer we're supposed to believe, but whether anyone in the real world could get away with the behaviour seen in the last half of this film is seriously doubtful. So over the top does it become that you're starting to laugh when Stegman is revealed as piano-playing prodigy gone bad or Corrigan, whose lab rabbits have been killed by the gang, takes his next class at gunpoint until Norris wrestles the firearm from him. "It's the only language they understand" is the moral of this, and while it can be enjoyable in a campy way nowadays, it's manipulative and dubious if you pause to think about it too long. Music by Lalo Schifrin.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 5317 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Mark L. Lester  (1946 - )

Prolific American director/producer who specialises in crowd-pleasing B-movies, usually action or horror. Earlier films include more serious works like the award-winning documentary Twilight of the Mayas and Steel Arena, plus 1976's hilarious exploiter Truck Stop Women, Bobbie Jo and the Outlaw and Roller Boogie, with Linda Blair.

The 1980s was Lester's most successful decade, with Arnold Schwarzenegger’s Commando, Firestarter, Class of 1984 and Armed and Dangerous all finding huge success on home video. Other films include Class of 1999, Showdown in Little Tokyo, Night of the Running Man and Blowback.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Smith
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: