HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Dragged Across Concrete
Do the Right Thing
Hellboy
Pond Life
Lego Movie 2: The Second Part, The
Third Wife, The
Shazam!
Follow Me
Leto
Fugitive Girls
Missing Link
Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith, The
Pet Sematary
Oh... Rosalinda!!
Dumbo
Kaleidoscope
Night Is Short, Walk On Girl
Knight of Shadows: Between Yin and Yang, The
Puppet Master: The Littlest Reich
Klute
Meow
Killer Crocodile
Nutcracker Prince, The
Secret World of Og, The
Benjamin
Fifth Cord, The
Man Could Get Killed, A
Cyborg 009: Kaiju War
Heavy Trip
Nightmare Weekend
Blue Ice
Great Scout & Cathouse Thursday, The
Incident, The
Hell's Angels
Heaven and Earth
Flatliners
Us
mid90s
Holiday
Lovin' Molly
   
 
Newest Articles
Trains and Training: The British Transport Films Collection Volume 13 on DVD
Holiday from Hell: In Bruges on Blu-ray
The Comedy Stylings of Kurt Russell: Used Cars and Captain Ron
Robot Rocked: The Avengers Cybernauts Trilogy on Blu-ray
Hammer's Bloodthirsty Bad Girls 1970: Lust for a Vampire and Countess Dracula
Hammer to Fall: Kiss Me Deadly on Blu-ray
Home of the Grave: The House That Dripped Blood and Asylum on Blu-ray
Wondrous Women: Supergirl vs Captain Marvel
Things Have Changed: Films You'd Be Insane to Make Now
The Hole in the Ground: Director Lee Cronin Interview
She's Missing: Director Alexandra McGuinness Interview
Woo's the Boss: Last Hurrah for Chivalry & Hand of Death on Blu-ray
Get Ahead in Showbiz: Expresso Bongo and It's All Happening
Outer Space and Outta Sight: Gonks Go Beat on Blu-ray
Tucked: The Derren Nesbitt Interview
   
 
  Woman in Green, The Buy this film here.
Year: 1945
Director: Roy William Neill
Stars: Basil Rathbone, Nigel Bruce, Hillary Brooke, Henry Daniell, Paul Cavanagh, Paul Cavanagh, Eve Amber, Frederick Worlock, Tom Bryson, Sally Shepherd, Mary Gordon
Genre: Thriller, Adventure
Rating:  6 (from 2 votes)
Review: The foggy streets of London are being stalked by a serial killer, responsible for “a series of the most atrocious murders since Jack The Ripper.” The killer’s macabre modus operandi involves the removal of the right forefinger of his female victims. The police are baffled and hope that Sherlock Holmes can catch the perpetrator, before another woman meets an untimely death.

The final film in the series to be written by Bertram Millhauser (responsible for the likes of The Spider Woman and The Pearl Of Death) The Woman in Green is a suitably mysterious and involving case for Holmes and Watson. Proceedings begin in a rather different tone from the rest of the series. A voiceover from what turns out to be the officer on the case, Inspector Gregson, gives the impression that this is a noirish detective film. Once Holmes arrives things settle into the familiar and effective formula but the presence of the Woman in Green with her femme fatale like qualities further echoes the film noir genre.

Running parallel to the narrative of Holmes’ investigations is the problem facing Sir George Fenwick. Waking up in a cheap boarding house near to the most recent murder he finds something unexpected in his jacket pocket and returns to his last remembered location, the abode of one Lydia Marlowe. Soon enough Holmes becomes involved in the activities of both Sir George and his female friend and it is not long before he realises that a criminal mastermind is at work. None other than that napoleon of crime, Professor Moriarty.

Holmes’ ultimate adversary has been given far greater prominence on the silver screen than he ever had in Doyle’s original stories. Used by Doyle as a way of giving Holmes a (not so) final send-off in The Final Problem filmmakers have revived him on many occasions to great effect. His inclusion in The Woman in Green gives the case a far more personal and dangerous edge for the crimefighter. Henry Daniell gets the chance to portray him, having made previous appearances in Universal’s Holmes’ films as various characters, and he does a good job. His interpretation is of a cold, calculating individual who gives the impression that he sets himself above the rest of mankind, detached from civil society and its rules and regulations. An entertaining performance although not quite as definitive as that of George Zucco.

Although the plot has nothing in common with the stories of Doyle (apart from one scene which will be familiar to those that have read The Adventure of the Empty House) it maintains an authentic atmosphere. The script gives Basil Rathbone plenty to do, whether it is revealing the minutiae of a murder at the crime scene, explaining to a bumbling Watson the traits of a female client by a cursory observation from his window, or engaging in taunting verbal exchanges with his arch nemesis. It goes without saying that his performance is reliably assured. Nigel Bruce, the perfect counterpoint to Rathbone, also gets the chance to play to his strengths, providing some entertaining comic relief, most memorably when the duo’s investigations take them to The Mesmer Club.

The Woman in Green (a rather odd title for a black and white film) is an enjoyable adventure for fans of the pipe-smoking detective. From the off it is an intriguing mystery with a satisfyingly elaborate resolution which places Holmes in a perilous predicament. The good news is that Holmes lives to see another day. The bad news is that his next case would be the rather lacklustre Pursuit To Algiers.
Reviewer: Jason Cook

 

This review has been viewed 3478 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
  Rachel Franke
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
Enoch Sneed
  Derrick Smith
Darren Jones
   

 

Last Updated: