HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Satanic Panic
Claudine
Harpoon
Great Northfield Minnesota Raid, The
Dark Phoenix
No Mercy
Arctic
Fate of Lee Khan, The
El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie
Ladyworld
Rocketman
Kid Who Would Be King, The
Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound
America America
Darkest Minds, The
Along Came Jones
Hummingbird Project, The
Under the Table You Must Go
Harry Birrell Presents Films of Love and War
Hanging Tree, The
Godzilla: King of the Monsters
Scooby-Doo! Camp Scare
Itsy Bitsy
Witchmaker, The
Prey, The
If It's Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium
Happy Death Day 2U
Full Moon High
Strange But True
Kamikaze 1989
Never Grow Old
Time of Your Life, The
Mountain Men, The
Epic
Best Before Death
John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum
Isabelle
Non-Stop New York
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood
Oblomov
   
 
Newest Articles
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
Battle of the Skeksis: The Dark Crystal Now and Then
American Madness: Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor and The Naked Kiss on Blu-ray
Flight of the Navigator and the 80s Futurekids
Trains and Training: The British Transport Films Collection Volume 13 on DVD
Holiday from Hell: In Bruges on Blu-ray
The Comedy Stylings of Kurt Russell: Used Cars and Captain Ron
Robot Rocked: The Avengers Cybernauts Trilogy on Blu-ray
Hammer's Bloodthirsty Bad Girls 1970: Lust for a Vampire and Countess Dracula
Hammer to Fall: Kiss Me Deadly on Blu-ray
Home of the Grave: The House That Dripped Blood and Asylum on Blu-ray
   
 
  Child's Play Poupée De Cire, Poupée De La MortBuy this film here.
Year: 1988
Director: Tom Holland
Stars: Catherine Hicks, Chris Sarandon, Alex Vincent, Brad Dourif, Dinah Manoff, Tommy Swerdlow, Jack Colvin, Neil Giuntoli, Juan Ramirez, Alan Wilder
Genre: Horror
Rating:  7 (from 3 votes)
Review: Serial strangler Charles Lee Ray (Brad Dourif) is on the run, being hunted down through the night time streets by policeman Mike Norris (Chris Sarandon). It looks as if time is up for the killer, as despite firing off shots at his pursuer he can't shake him off and makes a split second decision to take refuge in a toy store. Norris follows him as Ray hides amongst the merchandise, and manages to hit the psychopath with a bullet, leading to desperate measures - he knows he's about to expire so puts his voodoo practices into play by transferring his soul into the nearest Good Guy doll. One huge lightning strike later and Ray is dead - or is he?

Considering the high camp horrors that the Child's Play series turned into it's strange to see the original film approached with such straight faced vigour; in fact, the only laughs here are largely unintentional. From Don Mancini's story he and John Lafia and director Tom Holland crafted a typical eighties slasher with elaborate rubber effects and rather silly plotline to excuse its characters' behaviour. The expected antics with them being chased around by a two foot tall talking doll called Chucky, which Ray has tranferred his spirit into, don't occur until the last half, so there's a lot of "is he moving or isn't he?" business to contend with before that.

Interestingly, the family that Chucky settles with is a single parent one, as if to demonstrate, in a conservative twist, how much more difficult it is for a mother on her own to look after her child, although saving their offspring from deadly, possessed toys can't be high on most parents' lists. The mother in question is Karen Barclay (Catherine Hicks), who disappoints her son Andy (Alex Vincent, a young actor who constantly appears on the verge of forgetting his lines) on his birthday by not buying him the Good Guy doll he so desired. When she's at work, her friend (and obvious first victim) Maggie (Dinah Manoff) alerts her to a vagrant selling one of the toys behind the shop they serve in.

And wouldn't you know it, the doll she picks up is the very same that Ray put his soul into, but the only person who finds out is little Andy who becomes his confidant. So when babysitting Maggie is propelled out of the window of the apartment to her doom in a laughable sequence (which only happens because the scriptwriters needed a death in the first half hour) the police's suspicion centres on Andy due to the small footprints in the flour around the crime scene. Nobody believes him when he says that Chucky did it, and this tiresomely predictable development continues for as long as the audience can tolerate it, if not longer.

Norris is the detective investigating the Andy case, and he is particularly insensitive considering that Karen's best friend has just died, but when Chucky can't resist the appeal of revenge for much longer he discovers Andy was telling the truth in an especially ridiculous scene where the doll attacks him in his car. The only clever bit is where Karen realises that the talking Good Guy has been operating all this time without batteries, but mostly the film runs on the tram lines of the very much as we anticipated. Actually, the only truly creepy aspect is the giant sized Good Guy man-in-a-suit we see on TV - stick Brad Dourif in one of those and you may have had a better movie. As it was, Child's Play was successful enough for a run of sequels which thankfully employed irony after the third instalment, which may have been too late for some. Music by Joe Renzetti.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 5579 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
Andrew Pragasam
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: