HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Whoopee Boys, The
Set, The
Cyrano de Bergerac
Death Walks in Laredo
Gemini Man
End of the Century
If Beale Street Could Talk
Raining in the Mountain
Day Shall Come, The
Scandal
Buzzard
Race for Your Life, Charlie Brown
Shaun the Sheep Movie: Farmageddon, A
Sons of Denmark
Light of My Life
Umbrellas of Cherbourg, The
Jerky Boys, The
Chambre en Ville, Une
Joker
Relaxer
Mustang, The
Baie des Anges, La
Ready or Not
Seven Days in May
Bliss
Hollywood Shuffle
Uncut Gems
Wilt
Daniel Isn't Real
Presidio, The
Curvature
Puzzle
Farewell, The
Challenge of the Tiger
Ad Astra
Winslow Boy, The
Pain and Glory
Judgment at Nuremberg
Rambo: Last Blood
Sansho the Bailiff
   
 
Newest Articles
Demy-Wave: The Essential Jacques Demy on Blu-ray
The Makings of a Winner: Play It Cool! on Blu-ray
Sony Channel's Before They Were Famous: A Galaxy of Stars
Start Worrying and Hate the Bomb: Fail-Safe on Blu-ray
Completely Different: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 2 on Blu-ray
Bash Street Kid: Cosh Boy on Blu-ray
Seeing is Believing: Being There on Blu-ray
Top Thirty Best (and Ten Worst) Films of the 2010s by Andrew Pragasam
Top of the Tens: The Best Films of the Decade by Graeme Clark
Terrorvision: A Ghost Story for Christmas in the 1970s
Memories Are Made of This: La Jetee and Sans Soleil on Blu-ray
Step Back in Time: The Amazing Mr. Blunden on Blu-ray
Crazy Cats and Kittens: What's New Pussycat on Blu-ray
No Place Like Home Guard: Dad's Army - The Lost Episodes on Blu-ray
A Real-Life Pixie: A Tribute to Michael J. Pollard in Four Roles
We're All In This Together: The Halfway House on Blu-ray
Please Yourselves: Frankie Howerd and The House in Nightmare Park on Blu-ray
Cleesed Off: Clockwise on Blu-ray
Sorry I Missed You: Les Demoiselles de Rochefort on Blu-ray
Silliest of the Silly: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 1 on Blu-ray
Protest Songs: Hair on Blu-ray
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
   
 
  Amityville II: The Possession Sonny Acting FunnyBuy this film here.
Year: 1982
Director: Damiano Damiani
Stars: James Olson, Burt Young, Rutanya Alda, Jack Magner, Diane Franklin, Andrew Prine, Moses Gunn, Ted Ross, Erika Katz, Brent Katz, Leonardo Cimino
Genre: Horror
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: A family of six arrive at their new house in Amityville to move in. The father, Anthony Montelli (Burt Young) is a strict disciplinarian and is not happy when his son, Sonny (Jack Magner) drives up in his car later than everyone else after he told him to stick with his mother to show her the way. All that is forgotten when they enter the house and begin to look around, although they find all the windows have been nailed shut for some reason. When the mother, Dolores (Rutanya Alda) goes down into the basement where one of the removal men is, they discover what looks like a secret room, but it is dripping with damp and filthy with mud and worse. Is there something in there? Something waiting to come out?

Written by Tommy Lee Wallace, this prequel to the hit chiller The Amityville Horror supposedly illustrates the events that happened in the dreaded house before the Lutzes moved in and were terrorised by evil spirits, although it is never explicit about this. As there really was a multiple killing in real life, you could accuse this film, which presumes that there was a supernatural force for wickedness behind the murders, of poor judgement at best, and bad taste at worst, but the whole thing has a sleazy approach anyway. It also has the problem of everyone in its audience, even those who never saw the first film, knowing about the slaughter which is going to happen, a problem it never solves.

After things like Dolores being frightened out of her wits by an unseen thing in the basement and the mirror in the dining room falling off the wall when the family attempts to say grace at dinner, you might have thought it would dawn on them that all was not right here. And when an argument ends with a force drawing on the walls in paint and generally messing up the two youngest kids' bedroom, you might have thought it was time to get the hell out of there pretty sharpish. However, there wouldn't be much of a film if they did that, not that there's much of a film when they don't, and before long Sonny is receiving sinister messages through the headphones of his Walkman.

It's Sonny who is inflicted with the titular possession, which results in an aversion to the local priest, Father Adamsky (James Olson), bad skin, a lump on his neck and an incestuous attraction to his sister Patricia (Diane Franklin). Another problem with the storyline is that there isn't a main character: are we supposed to sympathise with the afflicted Sonny? Or his sister, who seems to know where all this is heading? Or, finally, Father Adamsky who sees it as his duty to purge the unfortunate but unsympathetic Sonny of evil? As for the other side, here is an abundance of swooping camera movement to suggest a malevolent presence, but any personality behind the haunting is nebulous.

Perhaps realising that they couldn't drag the Montelli plot out much further than an hour, the filmmakers get it over with with forty minutes of movie to go in an admittedly grim sequence where Sonny takes a shotgun to wipe out his family, although its grim quality is more down to its subject matter than its enactment. What we're left with is the priest taking centre stage to battle with the church about whether to perform an execution on Sonny or not, and being literally haunted by his decision to go fishing instead of checking out the house on the night of the murders. All this leads to a straight lift from The Exorcist, complete with exorcism and "take me!" shenanigans. The best you can say for Amityville II: The Posssession is that it goes way over the top in its efforts to find something to do with its predictable narrative, but not much more than that, although it has a couple more unsettling moments than the first film which gives it the advantage. Music by Lalo Schifrin.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 6313 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
  Butch Elliot
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Smith
Paul Shrimpton
   

 

Last Updated: