HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Invisible Man, The
Honey Boy
System Crasher
Judy & Punch
Bacurau
Battling Butler
Vivarium
Seven Chances
Dogs Don't Wear Pants
Navigator, The
Knives Out
Hit!
Charlie's Angels
Passport to Shame
Le Mans '66
Keep Fit
Doctor Sleep
Friend or Foe
Brass Target
Mine and the Minotaur, The
Sky Pirates
Syncopation
Sea Children, The
Ghost of a Chance, A
Go Kart Go
Great Buster, The
Seventy Deadly Pills
Wings of Mystery
Treasure at the Mill
VFW
Crime Wave
Terminator: Dark Fate
Slithis
Antonio Gaudi
Oscar, The
Color Out of Space
Last Holiday
Zombieland: Double Tap
Mind Benders, The
Mighty Wind, A
   
 
Newest Articles
Put the Boot In: Villain on Blu-ray
The Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 2: Vic Pratt Interview
All the Lonely People: Sunday Bloody Sunday on Blu-ray
Desperate Characters: Beat the Devil on Blu-ray
Chansons d'Amour: Alfie Darling on Blu-ray
Ozploitation Icon: Interview with Roger Ward
Godzilla Goes to Hollywood
Demy-Wave: The Essential Jacques Demy on Blu-ray
The Makings of a Winner: Play It Cool! on Blu-ray
Sony Channel's Before They Were Famous: A Galaxy of Stars
Start Worrying and Hate the Bomb: Fail-Safe on Blu-ray
Completely Different: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 2 on Blu-ray
Bash Street Kid: Cosh Boy on Blu-ray
Seeing is Believing: Being There on Blu-ray
Top Thirty Best (and Ten Worst) Films of the 2010s by Andrew Pragasam
Top of the Tens: The Best Films of the Decade by Graeme Clark
Terrorvision: A Ghost Story for Christmas in the 1970s
Memories Are Made of This: La Jetee and Sans Soleil on Blu-ray
Step Back in Time: The Amazing Mr. Blunden on Blu-ray
Crazy Cats and Kittens: What's New Pussycat on Blu-ray
No Place Like Home Guard: Dad's Army - The Lost Episodes on Blu-ray
A Real-Life Pixie: A Tribute to Michael J. Pollard in Four Roles
We're All In This Together: The Halfway House on Blu-ray
Please Yourselves: Frankie Howerd and The House in Nightmare Park on Blu-ray
Cleesed Off: Clockwise on Blu-ray
   
 
  Wings of Mystery Pigeons In Flight
Year: 1963
Director: Gilbert Gunn
Stars: Judy Geeson, Hennie Scott, Patrick Jordan, Francesca Bertorelli, Graham Aza, Anthony Jacobs, John Gabriel, Richard Carpenter, Arnold Ridley
Genre: Action, AdventureBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: Jane (Judy Geeson) and Don (Hennie Scott) are siblings with a real love of pigeon racing, which they do around the region of their Sheffield home with the assistance of their elderly mentor Mr Bell (Arnold Ridley), who they nickname "Ding Dong" on account of his name. But one day while out in the hills, they set their birds free to fly back home when one of the creatures injures itself, and when Bell rushes over to see to it, he falls to the ground having turned his ankle. Jane and Don help both bird and gent back to his home, unaware that their hobby will have serious consequences, for at the steelworks nearby a new alloy is being devised, and foreign agents would like to acquire it...

The Children's Film Foundation were well established by this stage, and had turned to a certain formula for their kid-friendly adventures, yet there were always variants to be employed: Wings of Mystery (there's a meaningless title) did not have any bad guy falling into water, for example, if anything it was more creative than that. It detailed the two young protagonists' endeavours to prevent the alloy sample from where their older brother works getting into the wrong hands, specifically an agent (Anthony Jacobs) who will go to great lengths to make sure he is able to smuggle a tiny rod of the stuff out of the country, leading to a substantial set of chases.

Judy Geeson would be the most famous face here, embarking on what would be a very good nineteen-sixties for her, with To Sir With Love in her future among other highlights, though Arnold Ridley was about to become almost as famous. The author of the theatrical warhorse The Ghost Train (not that he saw much money from it), he had returned to acting later in life and this decade would bring about his signature role of Private Godfrey in classic sitcom Dad's Army, where he was the oldest in the platoon, and indeed the cast. Though haunted by his experiences in World War One, he exuded a kindness that was evident here, even when he was playing a brusque Northerner.

"He looks like a foreigner!" says Jane of one character, which may lead you to expect something jingoistic, yet the film was careful not to tar every non-Brit with the same brush as the pair run away with their pigeon to the Continent (via plane) to get the agent before he is able to pass on the artefact. There they meet two foreign counterparts to open their minds about the decency of those across the Channel, who assist in what grows increasingly action-packed as it progresses, allowing it to be legitimately described as a sixties action flick for kids, and including a particularly well-handled sequence in a country house. The pigeon does its bit too, flying off with the alloy back to Sheffield, but the agent is in hot pursuit - fair enough, you don't doubt he will be stopped, but there is considerable invention in the way this unfolds. Incidentally, the older brother was played by Richard Carpenter, who gave up acting to write for television: Catweazle was one of his creations. Music by Derek New.

[This is one of nine films released by The BFI on DVD in the Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Volume 2.]
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 156 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
  Butch Elliot
Andrew Pragasam
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Smith
Paul Shrimpton
   

 

Last Updated: