HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Invisible Man, The
Honey Boy
System Crasher
Judy & Punch
Bacurau
Battling Butler
Vivarium
Seven Chances
Dogs Don't Wear Pants
Navigator, The
Knives Out
Hit!
Charlie's Angels
Passport to Shame
Le Mans '66
Keep Fit
Doctor Sleep
Friend or Foe
Brass Target
Mine and the Minotaur, The
Sky Pirates
Syncopation
Sea Children, The
Ghost of a Chance, A
Go Kart Go
Great Buster, The
Seventy Deadly Pills
Wings of Mystery
Treasure at the Mill
VFW
Crime Wave
Terminator: Dark Fate
Slithis
Antonio Gaudi
Oscar, The
Color Out of Space
Last Holiday
Zombieland: Double Tap
Mind Benders, The
Mighty Wind, A
   
 
Newest Articles
Put the Boot In: Villain on Blu-ray
The Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 2: Vic Pratt Interview
All the Lonely People: Sunday Bloody Sunday on Blu-ray
Desperate Characters: Beat the Devil on Blu-ray
Chansons d'Amour: Alfie Darling on Blu-ray
Ozploitation Icon: Interview with Roger Ward
Godzilla Goes to Hollywood
Demy-Wave: The Essential Jacques Demy on Blu-ray
The Makings of a Winner: Play It Cool! on Blu-ray
Sony Channel's Before They Were Famous: A Galaxy of Stars
Start Worrying and Hate the Bomb: Fail-Safe on Blu-ray
Completely Different: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 2 on Blu-ray
Bash Street Kid: Cosh Boy on Blu-ray
Seeing is Believing: Being There on Blu-ray
Top Thirty Best (and Ten Worst) Films of the 2010s by Andrew Pragasam
Top of the Tens: The Best Films of the Decade by Graeme Clark
Terrorvision: A Ghost Story for Christmas in the 1970s
Memories Are Made of This: La Jetee and Sans Soleil on Blu-ray
Step Back in Time: The Amazing Mr. Blunden on Blu-ray
Crazy Cats and Kittens: What's New Pussycat on Blu-ray
No Place Like Home Guard: Dad's Army - The Lost Episodes on Blu-ray
A Real-Life Pixie: A Tribute to Michael J. Pollard in Four Roles
We're All In This Together: The Halfway House on Blu-ray
Please Yourselves: Frankie Howerd and The House in Nightmare Park on Blu-ray
Cleesed Off: Clockwise on Blu-ray
   
 
  Zombieland: Double Tap I'll Zombie You In A Minute
Year: 2019
Director: Ruben Fleischer
Stars: Woody Harrelson, Jesse Eisenberg, Emma Stone, Abigail Breslin, Zoey Deutch, Avan Jogia, Rosario Dawson, Luke Wilson, Thomas Middleditch, Victoria Hall, Victor Rivera, Ian Gregg, Devin Mojica, Rachel Luttrell, John Dixon, Jess Durham, Bill Murray
Genre: Horror, ComedyBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: Here is Columbus (Jesse Eisenberg) to thank you for choosing this zombie entertainment, there are a lot of these around, after all, and to get us up to speed on what has happened in the ten years since the first Zombieland movie. The answer to that is, eh, not much as far as the humans go, his group of four survivors of the undead apocalypse continue to survive, though the zombies have started to evolve. He classes these as three distinct types: the Homer, the really stupid ones, the Hawking, the ones which can plan ahead and puzzle solve to eat flesh, and the Ninja, which can jump out at their victims without warning. All easily dealt with by the now-seasoned quartet, but there are issues...

Here it was not so much the zombies that were the problem, more the way people can fall out and relationships can break down, which in an apocalypse situation can really have a detrimental effect when the survivors are all supposed to be in this together, not squabbling. Though of course, characters arguing over the correct course of action had been a staple of zombie fiction since George A. Romero started the genre back in 1968 with Night of the Living Dead, and as the follow-ons from that classic basically repeated the same tropes over and over for the next number of decades, it was no real shock to see the sequel to Zombieland do similar, the first instalment had, after all.

That first movie had been a fair-sized hit, and had generated a decent amount of goodwill for its American take on the zomcom stylings of Britain's Shaun of the Dead; that may sound derivative, but zombie fiction purely exists to be derivative, and there were some solid gags and importantly, a very fine cast to carry the clich├ęs. What this sequel lacked was that surprise value, and it did try to make out that while ten years had gone by, nothing had really changed fundamentally, which if you were living in the real world away from the fictional may have been true in some ways, but ten years is not insignificant, and in others pretending 2009 was a year zero for culture didn't quite take.

Fortunately, director Ruben Fleischer, whose career had had ups and downs in the interim, was blessed yet again with a very strong cast. Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson as his father figure, Emma Stone as his love interest who realises she doesn't want to be defined by Columbus, and Abigail Breslin who just wants someone to love as her sister does (or eventually, doesn't) were an excellent team, and the screenplay, while giving a workshopped air, served them up with some highly amusing lines. Only Breslin didn't quite get her due, as she was more of a plot device - she runs away with pretentious hippy Avan Jogia to a supposed shelter from the anarchy outside its walls - and her costume designer appeared to be intent on displaying her d├ęcolletage to rival Linda Blair's in Hell Night for horror movie cleavage notables.

Elsewhere, the mood was irreverent and frequently laughter-inducing, with bits of business in The Whitehouse, a pair of doubles for Harrelson and Eisenberg for no reason other than it's silly, and best of all Zoey Deutch as a character who initially seems like a lazy dumb blonde joke until you realise how far she was committing to it, and how excellent her performance was - she was even redeemed as a result to turn endearing. If you're honest, had you not seen the first one for years the most you would recall would be the Bill Murray bit, and there was not much here that matched, never mind beat, that, yet while it played out this was very likeable and for a sequel, did not disgrace the source. If you were musing over its theme, it was helpful enough to spell that out for you - finding a home, then realising home was where the heart is, and your heart is with your friends and family, but never mind that schmaltz and enjoy Rosario Dawson driving a monster truck over the zombie hordes. All this and an Elvis Presley fixation into the bargain for pop culture points. Not bad at all. Music by David Sardy, and Harrelson sings The King for the credits.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 236 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
  Butch Elliot
Andrew Pragasam
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Smith
Paul Shrimpton
   

 

Last Updated: