HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Arctic
Fate of Lee Khan, The
El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie
Ladyworld
Rocketman
Kid Who Would Be King, The
Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound
America America
Darkest Minds, The
Along Came Jones
Hummingbird Project, The
Under the Table You Must Go
Harry Birrell Presents Films of Love and War
Hanging Tree, The
Godzilla: King of the Monsters
Scooby-Doo! Camp Scare
Itsy Bitsy
Witchmaker, The
Prey, The
If It's Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium
Happy Death Day 2U
Full Moon High
Strange But True
Kamikaze 1989
Never Grow Old
Time of Your Life, The
Mountain Men, The
Epic
Best Before Death
John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum
Isabelle
Non-Stop New York
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood
Oblomov
Alita: Battle Angel
We the Animals
Ibiza Undead
Wings of Eagles, The
Beats
Body Parts
   
 
Newest Articles
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
Battle of the Skeksis: The Dark Crystal Now and Then
American Madness: Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor and The Naked Kiss on Blu-ray
Flight of the Navigator and the 80s Futurekids
Trains and Training: The British Transport Films Collection Volume 13 on DVD
Holiday from Hell: In Bruges on Blu-ray
The Comedy Stylings of Kurt Russell: Used Cars and Captain Ron
Robot Rocked: The Avengers Cybernauts Trilogy on Blu-ray
Hammer's Bloodthirsty Bad Girls 1970: Lust for a Vampire and Countess Dracula
Hammer to Fall: Kiss Me Deadly on Blu-ray
Home of the Grave: The House That Dripped Blood and Asylum on Blu-ray
Wondrous Women: Supergirl vs Captain Marvel
   
 
  Strange But True Pre-Natal ObsessionBuy this film here.
Year: 2019
Director: Rowan Athale
Stars: Nick Robinson, Amy Ryan, Greg Kinnear, Brian Cox, Margaret Qualley, Connor Jessup, Blythe Danner, Janaya Stephens, Mena Massoud, Sarah Allen, Allegra Fulton, Dipal Patel, Darryl Flatman, Noah Denver, Christy Bruce, Tennille Read, Vanessa Burns
Genre: Thriller
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: Philip (Nick Robinson) and his mother Charlene (Amy Ryan) have a fractious relationship, and it's not because they don't love each other, they're simply sick of one another's company since they remind themselves of what is missing from their lives. Yes, Philip's father Richard (Greg Kinnear) moved out of the family home some time ago and remarried, but that's not the reason, it's down to the death of the elder son Ronnie five years ago, a tragedy none of them have ever gotten over. However, if that was not enough for them to suffer under, there's something else: Ronnie's girlfriend from their schooldays shows up on the doorstep one day, pregnant and claiming the baby is his...

Well, there's a conundrum and no mistake, how could the foetus still be gestating half a decade later, after the father has joined the choir invisible? You do get the answer to that in due course, but if it sounds like the hook in the blurb of your average paperback potboiler, you would not be far off as this was based on the popular novel of the same name by John Searles, the type of beach read that Gone Girl or The Girl on the Train could justifiably claim to be, even down to the revelatory twist. The format was doing very well on the page, but on film it can be too schematic to succeed, not that this prevents producers adapting them in the hope of ringing the world's box office tills.

Strange But True, which was certainly strange but was not very true, did not quite attain that cultural talking point status, it did well as a book but as a film it was not as widely released as you might have expected, going straight to streaming in most places outside of the United States. On surveying the cast list, you could express surprise, there were some big names here and some rising stars too: Margaret Qualley, who played the pregnant Melissa, was having a very good 2019, having appeared in Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood and hit television series Fosse/Verdon and proving herself highly adept at stealing scenes from more experienced co-stars in both those titles.

Here she was good at essaying a hard to read role, Melissa seems sincere enough, but then there's her story which is a medical impossibility - unless she has had outside help. Philip and Charlene, barely talking to each other anyway and this does not sweeten their bond, take it upon themselves to investigate separately, the son doing so while on crutches thanks to a recent accident which, come the ending foreshadowed in the first couple of minutes, appears to be established to put him at a disadvantage when he is being chased through the forest. Back at the beginning, Charlene goes back to her old place of work at the library to look up news stories on artificial insemination, for that would be a more obvious explanation for Melissa's state than some supernatural one; could she have frozen Ronnie's sperm without permission?

The actual reason is a lot more sinister, though a visit to a professional psychic halfway through would seem to be pushing this to horror territory, at least until the medium asks for a credit card at the end of the session, which places the uncertainty director Rowan Athale was capitalising upon front and centre once again. But as this wore on, you began to understand why it did not enjoy a wider release, it would have made a perfectly decent supporting feature decades ago, but standing on its own two feet saw it looking pretty small time rather than the blockbuster the cast perhaps were hoping for when they signed on. Despite that, and despite its muted tone for the first hour, once the threads were pulled together it perked up considerably and paid off its obfuscation with a very horrible explanation for what was going on, leading to an ending that may have been supposedly happy considering what had gone before, but was in effect twisted as you like. Unless you believe babies make everything better. Music by Neil Athale.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 200 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
Andrew Pragasam
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: