HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Captor, The
Hide in Plain Sight
Wildlife
X2
Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story by Martin Scorsese
Heiress, The
Cold Pursuit
Firestorm
Dogs of War, The
Holy Mountain, The
Piercing
Under Fire
Jennifer on My Mind
People on Sunday
Lethal Weapon 4
Downhill Racer
Emily
Odette
Escape Room
Across the Pacific
Madeline's Madeline
You're Gonna Miss Me
Iron Sky: The Coming Race
Derby
Mortal Engines
Union City
Knife+Heart
Little Stranger, The
Sauvage
Watermelon Man
Wandering Earth, The
Good Fairy, The
Killer Party
Holmes & Watson
Monster in the Closet
Sand, The
Glass
My Brilliant Career
Knife for the Ladies, A
Man in the Attic
   
 
Newest Articles
Woo's the Boss: Last Hurrah for Chivalry & Hand of Death on Blu-ray
Get Ahead in Showbiz: Expresso Bongo and It's All Happening
Outer Space and Outta Sight: Gonks Go Beat on Blu-ray
Tucked: The Derren Nesbitt Interview
Locomotion Pictures: The Best of British Transport Films on Blu-ray
Roman Scandals: Extreme Visions from Ancient Rome
Spider-Wrong and Spider-Right: The Dragon's Challenge and Into the Spider-Verse
Monster Dog: Cujo on Blu-ray
For Christ's Sake: Jesus Christ Superstar and The Last Temptation of Christ
Not In Front of the Children: Inappropriate Kids Movies
Deeper into Ozploitation: Next of Kin and Fair Game
Between the Wars: Babylon Berlin Series 1&2 on DVD
Hard Luck Story: Detour on Blu-ray
Oh, What Happened to You? The Likely Lads on Blu-ray
Killer Apps: The Rise of the Evil 60s Supercomputers
   
 
  You're Gonna Miss Me Music Of The MindBuy this film here.
Year: 2005
Director: Keven McAlester
Stars: Roky Erickson, Billy Gibbons, Gibby Haynes, Kurt Loder, Thurston Moore, Patti Smith, various
Genre: Documentary, Music
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: In the mid-sixties, Roky Erickson was the frontman of the American rock band The 13th Floor Elevators, which looked about to become massively popular as they pushed back the parameters of their style thanks to their embrace of psychedelic drugs, and letting those experiences inform their music. Alas, come the early twenty-first century and Erickson's lifestyle has turned seriously restricted, as years of substance abuse and very poor choices from those who were meant to be looking after him, including the authorities who tried to make an example of his drug-taking, have left him a shell of a man, whose ageing mother insists she knows how to take care of Roky and has left him barely functioning, seeing nobody...

The story of the acid casualty rock star is a familiar one, so much so that it has become a cliché; you could describe Roky as the American Syd Barrett had there not been other claimants to that unfortunate title, from Skip Spence to Brian Wilson, probably the most famous of the victims. Luckily for Wilson, he made a fortune while he was relatively functional, but the tales of the likes of Erickson were more typical: one or two hits to make their mark in their formative career, then diving into LSD and strong cannabis or some other hard drugs to fuel their creativity, after that paying the price for the rest of their lives as they struggled to get by once the damage had been done.

There was another, similar musician documentary released in 2005 that also garnered a cult following, The Devil and Daniel Johnston, which detailed the issues of a different schizophrenic singer with similarly tragic results. Like that film there was a sense that we were intruding on an existence that was exposing a poor soul at his lowest ebb with prurient or voyeuristic intent, though the director of You're Gonna Miss Me (also the title of Erickson's most famous song) insisted he wanted to commemorate his subject and ensure he was not forgotten. After all, it's bad enough to go through mental illness after such a promising beginning, but worse to have nothing to show for it.

Therefore director Keven McAlester was careful to gather as much footage of the man from his earlier years as he could, some of it extremely obscure, though seeing him presented by US TV legend Dick Clark was both valuable and amusing (Clark and his microphone make a beeline for the electric jug player, alas). Other times we see Erickson interviewed or onstage, and even in his more lucid moments the decline is evident: this is a man who had a legal certificate drawn up to state that he was no longer a member of the human race, but an alien. That could be eccentrically entertaining in isolation, but the more we learn about what has happened to him, the less charming his story is, from his mother dominating his life while not being totally healthy herself (she insists on treating her son alone, with Christianity and yoga).

Much of this film was based in the then-present, so at the beginning we witness the legal case brought by Roky's brothers and son to get him away from the clutches of his mother and onto some kind of medication and psychiatric treatment, which one of the brothers believes should be of a New Age variety. It has to be said, the rest of the clan are in a pretty poor way themselves, a pattern of depression that may be something to do with the taciturn father (we see him briefly, and he is a menacing presence no matter his advanced years). But the siblings have had help, and are a lot more capable than Roky, so the running time unfolds with the viewer willing this cheery yet obviously fragile man to get assistance and live up to his pioneering reputation that celebrity talking heads pop up to endorse. Happily, You're Gonna Miss Me did the trick, and after a string of broken relationships, drugs hell and enforced psychiatric imprisonment that did more harm than good, Roky was able to spend his last years feeling better and returning to the stage. Worth knowing once you get to the end of a troubling, almost eerie documentary.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 54 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
  Rachel Franke
Andrew Pragasam
Enoch Sneed
  Derrick Smith
Paul Shrimpton
Darren Jones
George White
   

 

Last Updated: