HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Werewolf
Little Monsters
Spider-Man: Far from Home
Horrible Histories: The Movie - Rotten Romans
Pentathlon
Anna
Moulin Rouge
Ray & Liz
African Queen, The
Helen Morgan Story, The
Golem, Der
Yentl
Finishing Line, The
Triple Threat
Mysterious Castle in the Carpathians, The
Driven
Planet of the Dinosaurs
Gwen
Big Breadwinner Hog
Thunder Road
Moby Dick
Frankenstein's Great Aunt Tillie
Mad Room, The
Phantom of the Megaplex
Night Sitter, The
Child's Play
Power, The
Midsommar
After Midnight
Dolemite is My Name
Varda by Agnes
Toy Story 4
Master Z: Ip Man Legacy
Man Who Never Was, The
Greener Grass
Scobie Malone
Gangster, the Cop, the Devil, The
Brightburn
Satanic Panic
Claudine
   
 
Newest Articles
Cleesed Off: Clockwise on Blu-ray
Sorry I Missed You: Les Demoiselles de Rochefort on Blu-ray
Silliest of the Silly: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 1 on Blu-ray
Protest Songs: Hair on Blu-ray
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
Battle of the Skeksis: The Dark Crystal Now and Then
American Madness: Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor and The Naked Kiss on Blu-ray
Flight of the Navigator and the 80s Futurekids
Trains and Training: The British Transport Films Collection Volume 13 on DVD
Holiday from Hell: In Bruges on Blu-ray
The Comedy Stylings of Kurt Russell: Used Cars and Captain Ron
   
 
  Suspiria Dance Of DeathBuy this film here.
Year: 2018
Director: Luca Guadagnino
Stars: Dakota Johnson, Tilda Swinton, Mia Goth, Chloë Grace Moretz, Angela Winkler, Elena Fokina, Ingrid Caven, Sylvie Testud, Renée Soutendijk, Jessica Harper, Doris Hick, Malgorzata Bela, Alek Wek, Fabrizia Sacchi, Mikael Olsson, Fred Kelemen, Jessica Batut
Genre: Horror
Rating:  4 (from 1 vote)
Review: Susie (Dakota Johnson) is keen to study dance at this exclusive Berlin academy, but is aware she must audition first, and the political climate she has arrived in, with left wing terrorists making their mark on the city and the whole of Europe - including currently an aeroplane hijack - is none too friendly. But she has self-belief, and as she emerges from the subway station in the drizzling rain, diligently following her map, she knows she is doing the right thing. What she is not aware of is that the student she is set to replace, Patricia (Chloë Grace Moretz), disappeared in mysterious circumstances, and just before she did, she contacted an elderly psychiatrist connected to the school...

By the time Suspiria had been remade in 2018, it seemed as if there were very few of the classic, and even cult classic, horror movies left to remake, which meant if they were not to be sequelised, producers would have to start remaking the remakes which were rarely as profitable as their originals, nor as artistically or even viscerally satisfying either. So it was here, a painfully longwinded retelling of one of the simplest narratives of all the most revered shockers from that groundbreaking decade of the nineteen-seventies: basically, Susie shows up at the ballet school, realises it's being run by a coven of evil witches, and foils them to the best of her ability, it was as uncomplicated as that.

Tell this to director Luca Guadagnino and apparently he would laugh in your face, for he took this almost insultingly small framework and added so many adornments that it buckled under its two-and-a-half hours weight. Sure, original director Dario Argento had been inspired by the script by himself and then-wife/star Daria Nicolodi to spin off in directions of their own, but they were all in the service of concocting a blaring, garish fever dream that had one desire, which was to freak out the audience. In the remake, we were invited to consider the political landscape of the seventies which the source material had hailed from, except you were never told precisely why that was important.

Not why the politics were important to the story, nor why you should be considering them away from the film, leaving them as window dressing, a real world terror to offset the supernatural shenanigans that came to a head in the last half hour. Yet that finale was less than coherent, more performance art, complete with agitprop primal screaming, added to exploding heads and full body makeup that meant something significant to the characters but almost nothing to anyone watching, failing to wrap anything up with any skill. To sit through such a long experience, especially for a horror film (Argento had it done and dusted in an hour less), and leave with nothing resolved as far as you could see, could only mean two things: they planned a sequel, in which case watch out for Inferno's remake, or they had allowed the material, here rambling about female cruelty, to get away from them.

The latter would appear to be the case, as Suspiria 2018 was not going to be looked on benevolently by horror fans who appreciated vintage Argento, which was just about all of them, nor would it appeal to the casual film fan who had never seen the original, and therefore would have no point of reference: this did seem to be relying on the viewer's familiarity with the first incarnation to assist in following the stodgy plotting. Argento had made such an impression thanks to his way with a nightmarish setpiece, and whatever criticisms could be levelled at his work, pretentious was not one of them, yet that was all over Guadagnino's efforts and he quickly discovered that hanging all this significance on a piece where the style was the substance was just going to collapse in a heap. As indeed his characters do after yet another modern dance workout. Every so often there was something that might have made this its own entity, Tilda Swinton's triple roles one of them, but it was scrappy in that respect, drably filmed in a misguided attempt to distance itself from Argento's visuals, and likely to have general audiences exiting well before the end. Noodly music by Thom Yorke, who was no Goblin.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 381 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (2)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Enoch Sneed
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
  Rachel Franke
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: