HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Rambo: Last Blood
Sansho the Bailiff
Iron Fury
Ride in the Whirlwind
Deathstalker II
Cloak and Dagger
Honeyland
Love Ban, The
Western Stars
League of Gentlemen, The
Higher Power
Shinsengumi
IT Chapter Two
Rich Kids
Arena
Glory Guys, The
Serial Killer's Guide to Life, A
Lovers and Other Strangers
Shiny Shrimps, The
Good Woman is Hard to Find, A
Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark
Doctor at Sea
Spear
Death Cheaters
Wild Rose
Streetwalkin'
Mystify: Michael Hutchence
Devil's Playground, The
Cleanin' Up the Town: Remembering Ghostbusters
Hustlers
Mega Time Squad
Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker
Souvenir, The
Birds of Passage
Ma
Woman at War
Happy as Lazzaro
Mickey's Christmas Carol
Marriage Story
Santa Claus is a Bastard
   
 
Newest Articles
Bash Street Kid: Cosh Boy on Blu-ray
Seeing is Believing: Being There on Blu-ray
Top Thirty Best (and Ten Worst) Films of the 2010s by Andrew Pragasam
Top of the Tens: The Best Films of the Decade by Graeme Clark
Terrorvision: A Ghost Story for Christmas in the 1970s
Memories Are Made of This: La Jetee and Sans Soleil on Blu-ray
Step Back in Time: The Amazing Mr. Blunden on Blu-ray
Crazy Cats and Kittens: What's New Pussycat on Blu-ray
No Place Like Home Guard: Dad's Army - The Lost Episodes on Blu-ray
A Real-Life Pixie: A Tribute to Michael J. Pollard in Four Roles
We're All In This Together: The Halfway House on Blu-ray
Please Yourselves: Frankie Howerd and The House in Nightmare Park on Blu-ray
Cleesed Off: Clockwise on Blu-ray
Sorry I Missed You: Les Demoiselles de Rochefort on Blu-ray
Silliest of the Silly: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 1 on Blu-ray
Protest Songs: Hair on Blu-ray
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
   
 
  Halloween Run Over By A LaurieBuy this film here.
Year: 2018
Director: David Gordon Green
Stars: Jamie Lee Curtis, Judy Greer, Andi Matichak, James Jude Courtney, Nick Castle, Haluk Bilginer, Will Patton, Rhian Rees, Jefferson Hall, Toby Huss, Virginia Gardner, Dylan Arnold, Miles Robbins, Drew Scheid, Jibrail Nantambu, P.J. Soles
Genre: Horror
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: It has been forty years since Michael Myers (James Jude Courtney and Nick Castle) went on a rampage on Halloween night and murdered five people, terrorising teenage Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis) in the process, though she did survive. In all that time, having been recaptured, Myers has been kept in a maximum security hospital for the criminally insane, and has never spoken a word; his previous doctor, Dr Loomis, was convinced he was sheer evil and unable to be rehabilitated, and it appears he was correct in that assessment. However, that does not prevent interest from the media every so often, and so it is a meeting with true crime podcasters triggers something awful in him...

If you regard true crime podcasters as utter ghouls, exploiting the worst of human misery for their own gain on their shows, then you might well be satisfied at what happens to the pair of presenters here, an anti-internet gag that was fitting with the old school grumpy old man serial killer who Michael Myers had surely become in this, his tenth appearance as the bad guy in one of horror fiction's longest running franchises. Yet as instigated by comedian Danny McBride, this was not your usual sequel, as it ignored all the others that had been made up to that point, and was not the third instalment of the series rebooted with Rob Zombie's two efforts from around ten years before.

What this Halloween was turned out to be more like what would have happened had the events of the first movie been so traumatic, so abhorrent, that they distorted time and sent the villain off into parallel universes to wreak his havoc in multiple timelines. As if aware of this, and since John Carpenter and Debra Hill's original spawned masses of imitators, who was to say it was not an accurate summation, this forty years later direct sequel to their initial efforts contained references to all the other entries, as if they were trying to break through into this universe and reassert themselves just as Michael was placing his stamp on the lives of those he intersected with.

This movie's main asset was Curtis, and on the publicity campaign trail she would tell anyone who listened that it was the first major horror of the Me Too movement, and she had a point, as it featured a trio of women, three generations of Strodes (Curtis, Judy Greer and newcomer Andi Matichak), who were mad as Hell and not going to take being victimised by some monstrous maniac anymore. In that way, Curtis had tapped into what the majority of slashers could lay claim to, asserting the heroic female over the sexist male, though of course not every sexist male turns to murder, but many do turn to violence. Naturally, that did not apply so much to the female killers in slasher movies, but in the main the recurring baddies in these efforts were male, your Michael, your Jason, your Freddy, and so on. By rendering this explicit here, it had genuine resonance.

Not that this sequel eclipsed the first one - except in box office revenue, where it became the second most successful horror of all time, behind the previous year's adaptation of Stephen King's IT, and it was very much in debt to the deceptively simple ideas in Carpenter and Hill's concepts, even to the point of restaging key shots and scenes from a different point of view. So it was not exactly its own entity, not as much as it had been if it was unconnected to the Halloween franchise, but how could it have been? The source was one of the touchstones of horror, a real classic, and director David Gordon Green was intent on paying tribute to a lasting premise (there was even a nod to odd man out Halloween III: The Season of the Witch in there). For that reason, it could come across as a shade too much in thrall to its predecessors, but that was a quibble, some would call this derivative, fans would call it a vital reboot, but whichever it was, it succeeded on those terms and built on them to craft a truly current chiller for the twenty-tens. And Carpenter returned to assist on the music as well as producing.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 376 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

David Gordon Green  (1975 - )

American indie director with a strong visual sense. Film school graduate Green made a big impression with his debut film, the powerful drama George Washington, while 2003's All the Real Girls was similarly well-received. An unexpected change of pace appeared when he directed stoner comedy Pineapple Express, the largest success of his career to that point, following it up with the widely reviled Your Highness. In contrast, the acclaimed Joe represented a return to his indie drama roots. After a lot of series television, he enjoyed his biggest hit with the 2018 Halloween sequel.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Smith
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: