HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Await Further Instructions
Ewoks: The Battle for Endor
In Order of Disappearance
Charlotte's Web
Meg, The
Christmas Blood
Equalizer 2, The
1985
Mowgli
Ski School
Ant-Man and the Wasp
Age of Shadows, The
Mission: Impossible - Fallout
Othello
First Reformed
Red White and Zero
Death Wish
Cry Wilderness
Heiresses, The
Millhouse: A White Comedy
Skyscraper
Born of Fire
Teen Titans Go! To the Movies
Lucia
Yanks
Sweet November
Ballad of Buster Scruggs, The
Real Men
Shoplifters
Redeemer
   
 
Newest Articles
Phone Freak: When a Stranger Calls on Blu-ray
A Name to Conjure With: David Nixon's Magic Box on DVD
Which 1950s Sci-Fi was Scariest? Invaders from Mars vs The Blob
The Empire Strikes Back: Khartoum vs Carry On Up the Khyber
Stan and Ollie's Final Folly: Atoll K on Blu-ray
The Big Grapple: Escape from New York and Its Influence
The Conquest of Everett: The Kenny Everett Video Show on DVD
Bout for the Count: Hammer's Dracula in the 1970s
Nopes from a Small Island: Mistreatment of American Stars in British Films
You Know, For Kids: Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box
If He Were a Carpenter and It Was the 80s: The Fog, Prince of Darkness and They Live
Tee-Hee, It's 80s Sci-Fi Horror: Night of the Comet, The Stuff and Night of the Creeps
Chance of a Ghost: The Uninvited and The Ghost and Mrs. Muir
3 Simian Slashers: Phenomena, Link and Monkey Shines
When is a Jackie Chan Movie Not a Jackie Chan Movie? Armour of God and City Hunter
   
 
  211 Nic NicBuy this film here.
Year: 2018
Director: York Alec Shackleton
Stars: Nicolas Cage, Alexandra Dinu, Sophie Skelton, Michael Rainey Jr, Dwayne Cameron, Weston Cage, Cory Hardrict, Ori Pfeffer, Mark Basnight, Amanda Cerny, Michael Bellisario, Raymond Steers, Derek Horse, Fedi Bashur, Jason Francis, Nick Donadio
Genre: Drama, Action, Thriller
Rating:  4 (from 1 vote)
Review: In Afghanistan, a series of bank transactions are made over the internet via a laptop out in the desert, and the man making a lot of money out of these arrangements walks out of the Portacabin happy, prepared to be driven off to enjoy his riches. However, suddenly shots ring out and his underlings drop like flies: when his driver attempts to escape with him and his assistant in the car, it is stopped by a bulldozer. Soon there are five mercenaries standing over him, pointing guns and demanding to know where their money is - he fudges the offer and the bad guys take matters into their own hands.

But where is Nicolas Cage? He is in this as a cop, but the fact he appears after about ten minutes of plot then actually speaks after about twenty should give you the idea he may have been hired for his name above the title value rather than any great use for his talents. If you were hoping for a classic Cage freakout, you would not get it here, the closest he comes is in an emotional scene where he carried so much baggage as an actor that you could be forgiven for laughing when the tone was intended to be tragic; not camp, exactly, since he was not really a comedian, simply looking rather silly.

This was supposed to be based on a real-life event that occurred in the nineteen-nineties, that shootout between robbers and police that happened to be broadcast on television as it happened and has gone down in semi-legendary status among those viewers who watched the drama unfold live. With all that in mind, if you knew of that story even in passing you would be aware this movie had more to do with another event of the nineties: the shootout scene in Michael Mann's Heat, which this not only aped but dragged out for around an hour of a pretty short running time of around eighty minutes.

To add human interest, professional snowboarder turned director York Alec Shackleton (grandson of explorer Ernest Shackleton, fact fans) mixed in a bunch of soap opera plotlines in the manner of a seventies made for TV disaster movie, which was all very well, but showed up a common problem of this era's action flicks, that they struggled with the human interest parts where there were no bullets flying or explosions detonated. And let's not start on the parts intended as light relief where the characters let their hair down and indulge in goodnatured joshing, which if anything were a step back from similar scenes witnessed in every U.S. cop show episode of the seventies by dint of not being particularly funny.

Those mercenaries we saw at the beginning make their way to Los Angeles for some reason - if it's that easy to get money over the internet, why bother leaving Afghanistan at all? Actually, why bother murdering the man who was willing to fund you anyway and do it the hard way? That can be answered in one sentence: there would be no movie. Unfortunately, this merely serves to illustrate the whole scheme was a complete waste of time, something you may be considering yourself after the half hour mark, when the shooting starts and demonstrates how difficult it is to hit someone with a bullet from about six feet away, or it is if you're this lot who couldn't hit the broad side of a barn without about fifty tries. The melodrama didn't land, the action showed off how adept Mann was at this sort of thing in comparison to his imitators, and it was obviously one of those cheapo East European shoots (Bulgaria, if you're interested) leaving 211 (a police code sign) as strictly for the Cage completists. They do exist. Music by Frederik Wiedmann.

[211, out to download now and on DVD 23rd July. Lionsgate's disc doesn't have extras, but it does have subtitles.]
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 232 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Stately Wayne Manor
George White
Paul Smith
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Aseels Almasi
Rashed Ali
   

 

Last Updated: