HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Harpoon
Great Northfield Minnesota Raid, The
Dark Phoenix
No Mercy
Arctic
Fate of Lee Khan, The
El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie
Ladyworld
Rocketman
Kid Who Would Be King, The
Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound
America America
Darkest Minds, The
Along Came Jones
Hummingbird Project, The
Under the Table You Must Go
Harry Birrell Presents Films of Love and War
Hanging Tree, The
Godzilla: King of the Monsters
Scooby-Doo! Camp Scare
Itsy Bitsy
Witchmaker, The
Prey, The
If It's Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium
Happy Death Day 2U
Full Moon High
Strange But True
Kamikaze 1989
Never Grow Old
Time of Your Life, The
Mountain Men, The
Epic
Best Before Death
John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum
Isabelle
Non-Stop New York
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood
Oblomov
Alita: Battle Angel
We the Animals
   
 
Newest Articles
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
Battle of the Skeksis: The Dark Crystal Now and Then
American Madness: Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor and The Naked Kiss on Blu-ray
Flight of the Navigator and the 80s Futurekids
Trains and Training: The British Transport Films Collection Volume 13 on DVD
Holiday from Hell: In Bruges on Blu-ray
The Comedy Stylings of Kurt Russell: Used Cars and Captain Ron
Robot Rocked: The Avengers Cybernauts Trilogy on Blu-ray
Hammer's Bloodthirsty Bad Girls 1970: Lust for a Vampire and Countess Dracula
Hammer to Fall: Kiss Me Deadly on Blu-ray
Home of the Grave: The House That Dripped Blood and Asylum on Blu-ray
   
 
  Phantom Thread Dress You UpBuy this film here.
Year: 2017
Director: Paul Thomas Anderson
Stars: Daniel Day Lewis, Vicky Krieps, Lesley Manville, Brian Gleeson, Gina McKee, Harriet Sansom Harris, Julia Davis, Eric Sigmundsson, Phyllis MacMahon, Sarah Lamesch, Jane Perry, Silas Carson, George Glasgow, Camilla Rutherford, Julie Vollono
Genre: Drama, Romance
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: Reynolds Woodcock (Daniel Day Lewis) is one of the top British fashion designers of the nineteen-fifties, and his gowns are much sought after by the richest women in society, but he is extremely particular about his working methods. His closest collaborator is his sister Cyril (Lesley Manville), who takes care of the administrative side of the business, allowing him to let his keenly honed talent enough space to breathe. But while he is a valued member of the rich wives and daughters' entourage, he really needs a muse to fire up his inspirations, and he happens to find another in the shape of Continental waitress Alma (Vicky Krieps) who he meets in a tea shop...

Phantom Thread was one of director Paul Thomas Anderson's character studies, where he would obsessively examine every angle of those peopling his story to build up some kind of commentary, in this case on the creative urge. It was very well received and won a cult following, yet perhaps was a little too chilly to find mainstream acceptance, for spending over two hours in the company of Lewis sounding like an English Werner Herzog was two hours too many for quite a lot of the audience. There was no getting away from it: he was creepy in this performance, which he claimed would be his last for the screen, resembling at times a vampire draining the life force from women.

But if you could imagine a vampire who finds a willing partner to drain, then ends up not being too bothered when she brings out the garlic (or mushrooms, in this case), then you would have a concept of this reserved, unsettling experience and what it had to offer. Although females are irresistibly drawn to Reynolds, it is more to do with the lure of the fashion world and Anderson apparently did not have a very high opinion of haute couture, even in its British form from over sixty years before he directed this. That distance from the subject was another reason there was a clinical air about the movie which meant some work had to be done to find it in any way endearing.

Well, endearing is probably the wrong word, but to have any affection for these remote characters you would have to find them as fascinating, in a bugs under the microscope way, as Anderson and Lewis did (they collaborated closely on the screenplay). Yet take the names of the characters, like a foreign visitor to not only Britain but also the past had come along to give his impression of what folks were like there, and ended up sounding like a parody, only there were precious few laughs to be gleaned from watching this. To add to that sense of spoof, Reynolds even saw a ghost in his delirium part of the way through the story simply because it was England, the most haunted region of the globe (supposedly), which was less mysterious and more a bit silly and lapsing into a touristy version of the land.

So gallons of tea were drunk, clipped tones were implemented, and our hero (if you could call him that) gets irritated when toast is not buttered properly or Alma pours her drinks with too high a distance from the cup or glass. It should have been funny, yet it was difficult to discern where the humour began and the serious contemplation of what you lose when you give over your life to your art started. Alma, once his inspiration, turns into his Achilles heel as she is welcomed into his home, adorned as a model, and wins his heart and marriage proposal, but for someone who is so exacting and precise about how everything should be just so, controlling women in a manner apart from his dress design proves beyond him, and he cracks up. Not cracks up laughing, that's not in his personality, so this is where the ghost enters into it and it leads up to an ending that is quietly macabre yet farfetched to say the least. Interesting as an academic exercise, but Phantom Thread never took off as entertainment. Music by Johnny Greenwood.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 520 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
Andrew Pragasam
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: