HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
You Don't Nomi
Man from the Alamo, The
Vast of Night, The
Furies, The
Days of the Bagnold Summer
Black Power Mix Tape 1967-1975, The
Apartment 1BR
1776
Parasite
Looking On the Bright Side
Take Me Somewhere Nice
Simon
Birds of Prey: And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn
Gentlemen Broncos
To the Stars
Lady Godiva Rides Again
Angelfish
Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ
Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, A
This is a Hijack
Loved One, The
Jumanji: The Next Level
Krabi 2562
Call of the Wild, The
Diary of a Country Priest
Sea Fever
Throw Down
Grudge, The
Green Man, The
Specialists, The
Convoy
Romantic Comedy
Going Ape!
Rabid
Infinite Football
Little Women
Camino Skies
Ema
Another Shore
Cry Havoc
   
 
Newest Articles
Who Watched The Watchmen?
The Golden Age of Colonic Irrigation: Monty Python Series 4 on Blu-ray
Lady of Pleasure: Lola Montes on Blu-ray
Take You to the Gay Bar: Funeral Parade of Roses on Blu-ray
Hit for Ms: Mark Cousins' Women Make Film on Blu-ray
Look Sinister: The 1000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse on Blu-ray
Star Wars Triple Threat: The Tricky Third Prequel and Sequel
I Can See for Miles: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes on Blu-ray
Too Much Pressure: The Family Way on Blu-ray
The Alan Key: Alan Klein and What a Crazy World on Blu-ray
A Japanese Ghost Story: Kwaidan on Blu-ray
The Zu Gang: Zu Warriors from the Magic Mountain on Blu-ray
Reality TV: The Year of the Sex Olympics on DVD
The Young and the Damned: They Live By Night on Blu-ray
Mind How You Go: The Best of COI on Blu-ray
Der Kommissar's in Town: Babylon Berlin Series 3 on DVD
The End of Civilisation as We Know It: The 50th Anniversary
The Whalebone Box: The Andrew Kotting Interview
Being Human: The Elephant Man on 4K UHD Blu-ray
It's! Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 3 on Blu-ray
Put the Boot In: Villain on Blu-ray
The Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 2: Vic Pratt Interview
All the Lonely People: Sunday Bloody Sunday on Blu-ray
Desperate Characters: Beat the Devil on Blu-ray
Chansons d'Amour: Alfie Darling on Blu-ray
   
 
  Marty When Ya Gonna Get Married?
Year: 1955
Director: Delbert Mann
Stars: Ernest Borgnine, Betsy Blair, Esther Minciotti, Augusta Ciolli, Joe Mantell, Karen Steele, Jerry Paris
Genre: Drama, RomanceBuy from Amazon
Rating:  8 (from 2 votes)
Review: Marty Piletti (Ernest Borgnine) is a butcher in The Bronx district of New York City who last weekend saw his brother get married to a nice Italian girl, and this has raised the question he always hates to be asked: "When are you getting married?" As a thirty-four-year-old bachelor, the eldest son of a widow (Esther Minciotti) still living with her to look after her, he has heard this all before, yes, he should have settled down with a nice Italian girl of his own by now, but it's a lot more difficult to find love than everyone seems to think. It's Saturday night again, so maybe he and his best pal Angie (Joe Mantell) will paint the town red - or maybe they will stay at home and watch television.

Poor old Marty, or at least poor old Marty in the light of the critical reception he meets these days, for he had the bad luck to be released the same year as Rebel Without a Cause, and not only did Marty win Best Picture at the Oscars (and the Palme d'Or), but Borgnine won the Best Actor Oscar too. James Dean seems the sentimental favourite from a twenty-first century perspective, his heartfelt performance speaking to generation upon generation of mixed-up kids, but looking back, Ernie's performance was no less resonant, he just happened to be essaying the role of a far less cool character, a sad sack well on the way to years of middle-aged disappointment, not some hip teen.

This has led Marty to be reassessed as a quirk of Hollywood's panic over television making inroads into its market in the nineteen-fifties, where everything got bigger, wider, louder and more colourful in an attempt to coax audiences away from their small screens and back to the silver screen. But another aspect of this would be to adapt television properties that had been hits there for movie versions, often using television talent to recreate them, and Marty was the first of those, a work that had originally been a TV play starring Rod Steiger, who was not asked to reprise his role when the producers, who included Burt Lancaster, reasoned audiences would want someone different to enjoy.

Therefore Borgnine, who was making his name as villainous heavies in increasingly major films, was recruited, and walked away with the Oscar as a result. Marty isn't quite looked on with the disdain that The Greatest Show on Earth is for worst Best Picture of the Golden Age, but there were those who looked at it again and decided it was pretty small beer, at best a sweet little sketch that was overpraised, at worst a self-consciously "ordinary" tale that patronised its characters and indeed the audience. Yet for all its admitted posturing as a salt of the earth yarn about folks you could meet on any city street in fifties America, there was nothing aggressive about its feeling for Marty and the woman he finally clicks with, Clara (Betsy Blair, then the blacklisted wife of Gene Kelly), indeed, it was more perceptive than it was given credit for.

Admittedly this would be a hard sell for a blockbuster hit today, more suited for a minor indie movie, but if Moonlight can win an Oscar then Marty could be regarded as its spiritual ancestor, the little film that conquered the world - and Moonlight was by no means universally loved either. What writer Paddy Chayefsky and director Delbert Mann got right as they both returned to the material that won them acclaim on TV, was the sheer Hell the pressure to find a partner can bring, that social judgement that if you are not part of a couple then there must be something lacking in your life, or worse, there must be something wrong with you. What made it all the more poignant for our hero here was that as much as he was resigned to being a bachelor, if the right woman came along he would be delighted to romance her if his love was reciprocated, and when it appears as if that dream may come true, more pressures in the shape of his overbearing mother who reacts jealously or his boorish friends who treat women as conquests, not as human beings as Marty does, serve to potentially sabotage his happiness. No, not an epic to stir the soul, but stirring nonetheless if you responded to its compassion. Music by Roy Webb.

[Eureka present a crisp Blu-ray picture, and extras including the original TV play, interviews with Mann and others connected with it, and a critic's overview of the film.]
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1344 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (1)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
  Hannah Prosser
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
  Butch Elliot
  Rachel Franke
Paul Smith
   

 

Last Updated: