HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Beach Bum, The
Kill Ben Lyk
Into the Mirror
Support the Girls
Werewolf
Little Monsters
Spider-Man: Far from Home
Horrible Histories: The Movie - Rotten Romans
Pentathlon
Anna
Moulin Rouge
Ray & Liz
African Queen, The
Helen Morgan Story, The
Golem, Der
Yentl
Finishing Line, The
Triple Threat
Mysterious Castle in the Carpathians, The
Driven
Planet of the Dinosaurs
Gwen
Big Breadwinner Hog
Thunder Road
Moby Dick
Frankenstein's Great Aunt Tillie
Mad Room, The
Phantom of the Megaplex
Night Sitter, The
Child's Play
Power, The
Midsommar
After Midnight
Dolemite is My Name
Varda by Agnes
Toy Story 4
Master Z: Ip Man Legacy
Man Who Never Was, The
Greener Grass
Scobie Malone
   
 
Newest Articles
Please Yourselves: Frankie Howerd and The House in Nightmare Park on Blu-ray
Cleesed Off: Clockwise on Blu-ray
Sorry I Missed You: Les Demoiselles de Rochefort on Blu-ray
Silliest of the Silly: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 1 on Blu-ray
Protest Songs: Hair on Blu-ray
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
Battle of the Skeksis: The Dark Crystal Now and Then
American Madness: Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor and The Naked Kiss on Blu-ray
Flight of the Navigator and the 80s Futurekids
Trains and Training: The British Transport Films Collection Volume 13 on DVD
Holiday from Hell: In Bruges on Blu-ray
   
 
  Baskin Welcome To HellBuy this film here.
Year: 2015
Director: Can Evrenol
Stars: Mehmet Cerrahoglu, Görkem Kasal, Ergun Kuyucu, Muharrem Bayrak, Fatih Dokgöz, Sabahattin Yakut, Berat Efe Parlar, Sevket Süha Tezel, Seyithan Özdemir, Sevinc Kaya, Mümin Kaar, Fulya Peker, Fadik Bülbül, Elif Dag, Mehmet Akif Budak, Zafer Talibas
Genre: Horror, Weirdo
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: When Arda (Görkem Kasal) was a young boy, he had the strangest dream. It was more than a dream, it was a nightmare, where he woke up from a troubled sleep in his bedroom and heard strange noises emanating from his parents' bedroom. He got out of bed and approached the door, when the noises stopped and he noticed in the living room that the television was on, but not tuned in, displaying static, and as he went over he realised something was watching him from the doorway of his room. He ran over to his parents' door and screamed for help, but it was locked and there was a claw-like, bloody hand reaching out for him... But that was all a dream, after all. Wasn't it?

Director Can Evrenol had been making short films for a few years when he decided to expand one of them into his debut feature, at the encouragement of some fans and professionals who felt there was much promise in it. Baskin was the result, and though in the twenty-first century horror was getting a harder time from audiences than ever, despite its upswing in popularity, this was well-received in enough places to prompt many aficionados of the more outré shockers to check it out, and by and large they were not disappointed. Don't try to sell it to the mainstream horror fan, would seem to be the message of its regard, this was for the more seasoned appreciator of the genre.

Baskin was that rare thing, a Turkish horror movie, which given how notorious their nation's cinema had grown among cult movie buffs with its seemingly-endless parade of rip-offs, all of them unauthorised, must have led hearts to sink across the world. But give this one a chance, for while it certainly wore its influences on its sleeve, it was very much its own project; if anything, it was one of the most exquisitely photographed chillers of its era, every frame a picture worth hanging on the walls of an art gallery. That many of those frames were somewhat unorthodox, and indeed rather revolting, indicated a gallery was perhaps not the best place for it - maybe somewhere near a Chapman Brothers exhibition.

There had obviously been a lot of thought and care put into how this would look, and the visual effects were used sparingly but strikingly: there were no computer graphics-based monsters to be seen here, everything about the enemy was realised with physical makeup and costuming. But who were the enemy? They didn't show up until the last half, as the first was concerned with an incremental build-up of dread which centred around what Arda does currently in his job as a policeman. Now, seeing what happens to him and his colleagues may have had you believing Evrenol had a genuine grudge against the cops, but according to the man himself this was more about laying siege to the sense of family that being in a high-pressure job can engender, and placing that under violent threat.

To say too much would spoil the film's surprises, but suffice to say this was a story that took place entirely at night: the sun didn't go down at the beginning, and it assuredly did not rise at the end, indeed you could believe in this three o'clock in the morning world that the sun would never rise again, it was too scared. But we are introduced to the group of police when they are sitting about a roadside café talking about sex, one of them doing so extremely boorishly, and after he gets into a scuffle with a staff member they realise one of their number has disappeared. It's OK, he was just in the bathroom: throwing up and screaming at his reflection in the mirror, another indication events are about to take an unfortunate turn. That this ends up with an encounter with a cosmic cult somewhere between H.P. Lovecraft and Clive Barker is not saying too much, yet with a tricksy structure and those luminous images, Baskin may not have been the most coherent horror flick around, but it was well worth investigating for those interested in straying from the path of the usual fare. John Carpenter-ish music by Ulas Pakkan.

[The Severin Blu-ray looks and sounds terrific, and as extras has a making of featurette, the original short film, and the trailer.]
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 660 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Enoch Sneed
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
  Rachel Franke
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: