HOME |  JOIN |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Marjorie Prime
Hotel Salvation
Mangler, The
Shiraz
Mercy, The
Kickboxer: Retaliation
Molly Maguires, The
Party, The
Dante's Peak
Housemaid, The
Vendetta
Brimstone
Boys in the Trees
Once Were Warriors
Red Planet Mars
Blade Runner 2049
Devil's Express
Belko Experiment, The
Flashback
War of the Arrows
One-Trick Pony
Cloverfield Paradox, The
Beach Rats
In Between
Flesh Feast
Gerald's Game
Crocodile Dundee II
Baaghi
Bat People, The
Kingsman: The Golden Circle
   
 
Newest Articles
They're All Messed Up: Night of the Living Dead vs Land of the Dead
The House, Black Magic and an Oily Maniac: 3 from 70s Weird Asia
80s Meet Cute: Something Wild vs Into the Night
Interview with The Unseen Director Gary Sinyor
Wrong Forgotten: Is Troll 2 Still a Thing?
Apocalypse 80s UK: Threads and When the Wind Blows
Movie Flop to Triumphant TV Revival: Twin Peaks and The League of Gentlemen
Driving Force: The Golden Age of American Car Chases
Madness in his Method: Jim Carrey and Andy Kaufman
Music, Love and Flowers: Monterey Pop on Blu-ray
   
 
  Party, The Vol-Au-WrongsBuy this film here.
Year: 2017
Director: Sally Potter
Stars: Timothy Spall, Kristin Scott Thomas, Patricia Clarkson, Bruno Ganz, Cherry Jones, Emily Mortimer, Cillian Murphy
Genre: Comedy, Drama
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: Bill (Timothy Spall) sits in his living room listening to music at high volume and sipping a glass of wine; as he does so, he notes a fox sniffing around the patio doors, yet barely reacts as his wife Janet (Kristin Scott Thomas) busies herself in the kitchen. She is celebrating because she has today been announced as Shadow Minister for Health, which marks her continuing rise up the political ladder, and with that in mind has invited a few friends around for some drinks and vol-au-vents, which she is preparing herself. However, as she receives calls on her phone to congratulate her, there's someone else who keeps contacting her - could it be that she has been carrying on an affair behind Bill's back?

The Party 2017 was not to be confused with the Peter Sellers comedy of the late nineteen-sixties, though this was intended to provoke laughter, it was a good deal more caustic in its effects as it took on the mores of the left of the political divide. Filmed in black and white, it took place in one house, as the Sellers movie had done, and also delineated the breaking down of the social niceties into chaos, but the sixties effort had been more to do with a letting down of hair, whereas this was more to do with letting down your nearest and dearest as we see when the two hosts and the five guests (with one on the way but delayed) encounter revelations that shake them to their very cores.

Many were wont to see Mike Leigh in this, as if writer and director Sally Potter was channelling his muse to craft a satirical look at the illusions her character were labouring under, but Leigh was less likely to be so overtly political; Potter was happy to send up her characters as if everything they believed when contrasted with the way they behaved revealed them to be utter hypocrites. She had assuredly assembled an excellent cast, each well-versed in stage craft therefore more than able to carry this sort of intense, and intensive, thespianism as if they were performing in a filmed play; there was a sixties television vibe to it, that sense of low budget small screen exploration underway.

No matter that Potter had opted to shoot in the Cinemascope ratio, presumably to say, it is a real film, honest, though in truth neither that frame nor the gleaming monochrome photography came across as anything but window dressing when it was what the partygoers said to one another that was the important thing. Bill obviously had something on his mind that was apart from his wife's success, and he would drop not one but two bombshells before the hour was up - the entire drama was about seventy minutes in length, including the end credits. But then, everyone in that house, once collected in one place, had a revelation to deliver, some more predictable than others, the pregnancy of Jinny (Emily Mortimer) for instance being easy to see, but not the fact she was carrying triplets thanks to fertility treatment.

She is the wife of Martha (Cherry Jones), one of Janet's associates, and also present were April (Patricia Clarkson, proving once again waspish was the best way to experience her) and her soon to be ex-boyfriend, the spacey Gottfried (Bruno Ganz), plus Tom (Cillian Murphy) whose wife is the delayed one and wastes no time in getting high on cocaine in the bathroom - he's also brought a gun. This lot were intended to expose the gap between the ideals of the Left and the reality of the deep divisions between even those who were supposed to be on the same side, the more liberal aspect of society seemingly more liable to find things to argue among themselves about instead of tackling their opponents, yet as this was released it was clear the Right were succumbing to that as well, confusing the political landscape and giving rise to a terrible uncertainty in the nation. Fair enough, there was comedy and drama to be mined from this, but The Party was just that bit too hysterical to convince; if it had built to a better punchline it might have satisfied more, but as it was, a decent enough piece for actor fanciers.

[Picturehouse's Blu-ray looks and sounds spiffing, with a million interviews as extras.]

Click here for the TV spot

Click here to order the disc, out 19th February
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 55 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Who's the best?
Robin Askwith
Mark Wahlberg
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
Paul Smith
Darren Jones
Jason Cook
  Andrew Irvine
Ian Phillips
Paul Shrimpton
   

 

Last Updated: