HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Vast of Night, The
Furies, The
Days of the Bagnold Summer
Black Power Mix Tape 1967-1975, The
Apartment 1BR
1776
Parasite
Looking On the Bright Side
Take Me Somewhere Nice
Simon
Birds of Prey: And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn
Gentlemen Broncos
To the Stars
Lady Godiva Rides Again
Angelfish
Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ
Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, A
This is a Hijack
Loved One, The
Jumanji: The Next Level
Krabi 2562
Call of the Wild, The
Diary of a Country Priest
Sea Fever
Throw Down
Grudge, The
Green Man, The
Specialists, The
Convoy
Romantic Comedy
Going Ape!
Rabid
Infinite Football
Little Women
Camino Skies
Ema
Another Shore
Cry Havoc
Legend of the Stardust Brothers, The
Mystery Team
   
 
Newest Articles
Who Watched The Watchmen?
The Golden Age of Colonic Irrigation: Monty Python Series 4 on Blu-ray
Lady of Pleasure: Lola Montes on Blu-ray
Take You to the Gay Bar: Funeral Parade of Roses on Blu-ray
Hit for Ms: Mark Cousins' Women Make Film on Blu-ray
Look Sinister: The 1000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse on Blu-ray
Star Wars Triple Threat: The Tricky Third Prequel and Sequel
I Can See for Miles: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes on Blu-ray
Too Much Pressure: The Family Way on Blu-ray
The Alan Key: Alan Klein and What a Crazy World on Blu-ray
A Japanese Ghost Story: Kwaidan on Blu-ray
The Zu Gang: Zu Warriors from the Magic Mountain on Blu-ray
Reality TV: The Year of the Sex Olympics on DVD
The Young and the Damned: They Live By Night on Blu-ray
Mind How You Go: The Best of COI on Blu-ray
Der Kommissar's in Town: Babylon Berlin Series 3 on DVD
The End of Civilisation as We Know It: The 50th Anniversary
The Whalebone Box: The Andrew Kotting Interview
Being Human: The Elephant Man on 4K UHD Blu-ray
It's! Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 3 on Blu-ray
Put the Boot In: Villain on Blu-ray
The Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 2: Vic Pratt Interview
All the Lonely People: Sunday Bloody Sunday on Blu-ray
Desperate Characters: Beat the Devil on Blu-ray
Chansons d'Amour: Alfie Darling on Blu-ray
   
 
  Cold-Blooded Beast Insane-itarium
Year: 1971
Director: Fernando Di Leo
Stars: Klaus Kinski, Margaret Lee, Rosalba Neri, Jane Garret, John Karlsen, Gioia Desideri, Giangiacoma Elia, Fernando Cerulli, Sandro Rossi, Giulio Baraghini, Ettore Geri, Antonio Radaelli, Monica Strebel, Carla Mancini, Franco Marletta, Pietri Nistri
Genre: Horror, Sex, Thriller, TrashBuy from Amazon
Rating:  4 (from 1 vote)
Review: There is this medieval castle that has been converted in modern times into a rest home for mentally unstable women, staffed with medical practitioners who see to it that the patients are kept calm and on the road to recovery. However, last night before a new arrival there was a black-clad, cloaked figure stalking the grounds of the building who entered by a side door and began to wander the corridors until he settled on a room that contained the castle's original tenants' weaponry and torture devices, such as a mace, an axe and an iron maiden. He selected an axe and went upstairs to spy on a sleeping, nude woman, Anne (Rosalba Neri), there for treatment for nymphomania...

Oh, a nymphomaniac in an Italian giallo! Will there by any chance be a lesbian as well? Cold-Blooded Beast, or La bestia uccide a sangue freddo as it was originally known, was better known in some territories as Slaughter Hotel, but the most complete version out of a selection of cuts of varying intensity, was called by that first name. There was a French version which had the most sexually explicit sequences and that eventually became the default edit that proved most popular, not really that surprising, but watching it did come across as if director Fernando Di Leo had had his heart set on making a pornographic movie and all the murderer thriller business was a distraction.

In fact, some aficionados questioned whether this could genuinely be classed as a giallo, or if it was merely a cross between what slasher movies would become and where softcore was at in the Italy of the nineteen-seventies. However, the presence of a masked killer and glamorous ladies among his victims probably settled the matter: this was a giallo after all, borderline perhaps, but the hallmarks were present however swamped they were in the other bits of business Di Leo included. He admitted he was none too keen on this effort, and indeed proved shortly after to be far more adept at crime thrillers, or polizzioteschi as they became known as in his native land: this was assuredly not that.

The cast had some interesting names, not only Neri who was proving popular on the Continent in movies where she was required to be parted from her clothes, and here stuck with a stereotype nympho role where the only element of character development when she wasn't pursuing the male staff was a scene where she discusses her condition with her brother and we realise she was rather closer to him than was healthy, in spite of him rejecting her advances. This sort of perversion was equated with the lesbians, an African lady (Jane Garret in her sole film) who is seduced by a massage-happy nurse (Monica Strebel), which apart from being a serious breach of professional confidence was at least presented as satisfying to both parties (they even had a dance together to "African" music).

Nevertheless, homosexual women in giallos were there to be punished, so after a long wait for something to happen that was relevant to the thriller plot, a nurse is beheaded with a scythe (then promptly forgotten about) and the murders begin, leaving us in no doubt why we have spent so long with certain patients when they will be bumped off sooner or later. The prime suspect to anyone with experience of this genre had to be resident doctor Klaus Kinski, that perennial bad guy (in real life as well as the movies) who was either being set up as a major red herring or was the culprit all along, either way the ending would be difficult to second guess, which one supposes was a point in the film's favour. But this was rote stuff even with the sexual angle, doing little novel with what had already become clich├ęs in a very exacting style of chiller, and with a pace that did not so much build to a crescendo as wind down with a massacre, if you can imagine that concept. Music by Silvano Spadaccino.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1828 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
  Hannah Prosser
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
  Butch Elliot
  Rachel Franke
Paul Smith
   

 

Last Updated: