HOME |  JOIN |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Base
Tampopo
My Life as a Courgette
Cold-Blooded Beast
Lake Mungo
One-Eyed Jacks
20th Century Women
Monster Trucks
Lookout, The
Black Belt
Resident Evil: The Final Chapter
Their Finest
Stella Cadente
Water Drops on Burning Rocks
Replace
Belladonna of Sadness
Aquarius
Erik the Conqueror
Baghead
Guns at Batasi
Gang Story, A
Magnificent Ambersons, The
Climber, The
It's a Big Country
Raw
Last Man Standing
Transfiguration, The
Alien Nation
Kajaki
Certain Fury
   
 
Newest Articles
The Empress, the Mermaid and the Princess Bride: Three 80s Fantasy Movies
Witching Hour: Hammer House of Horror on Blu-ray
Two Sides of Sellers: The Party vs The Optimists
Norse Code: The Vikings vs The Long Ships
Over the Moon - Space: 1999 The Complete Series on Blu-ray Part 2
Alpha Males and Females - Space: 1999 The Complete Series on Blu-ray Part 1
Animated Anxieties: From the Era of the Creepiest Cartoons
Manor On Movies--Clegg (1970)
Plans for Nigel: The Crunch... and Other Stories on DVD
Let's Get Harry: Repo Man and Paris, Texas
   
 
  Replace Out Of Her SkinBuy this film here.
Year: 2017
Director: Norbert Keil
Stars: Rebecca Forsythe, Lucie Aron, Barbara Crampton, Sean Knopp, Adnan Marnal, Agnes Kiyomi Decker, J. David Hinze, Teresa Gluck, Daniel Holzberg, Matthais Beier, Laura Cuenca Serrano, Felix von Poser, Lea Urban, Genevieve Bohmer, Julia Maraucher
Genre: Horror, Science Fiction
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: Kira Mabon (Rebecca Forsythe) has met a nice man (Sean Knopp) on a night out, and one thing leads to another as they hit it off conversationally, discussing among other things how as a woman she would hate to grow old, but she doesn't mind it in men since experience counts for a lot. Once back at his place, they get very familiar with one another and she wakes up in his bed the next morning feeling refreshed and... rather lost. She should know who she is, but for some reason her memory is failing her, and she cannot remember where her home is nor what she is supposed to be doing today. The man she was with, whose apartment she assumes this to be, is nowhere to be seen, so she decides to stick around until she gets her bearings...

Replace was notable in the horror field for Richard Stanley's name in the credits; the one-time bright new hope of chiller cinema for his work in Hardware and to a lesser extent Dust Devil, was a writer on this project. He co-scripted with director Norbert Keil and they conjured up a very David Cronenberg plot, except it wasn't quite, as the approach, far from the hard-edged and clear eyed one the great Canadian director would have adopted, was more dreamlike, surreal even, as Kira descends into degradation of possibly her own making. Or it could possibly be of a sinister machination that she was somehow involved with somewhere before we caught up with her as her body begins to rebel.

Where Marilyn Chambers was given a new implant in Rabid that spread the titular disease, there was nothing so ambitious in this Canadian/German co-production, though the fairly low budget was implemented with some skill to craft a stylish, if potentially squeamish, experience. Keil favoured soft focus to bring out that unreal quality, but the theme was plainly related to us from the outset from that conversation about a young woman hating the ageing process: it would seem some shadowy consortium was trying to find a cure for that, and Kira had become a part of it when she develops a skin disease that sees her crumbling and flaking in a condition that spreads across her dermis, though her solution is drastic.

She finds she can replace the dead skin with, well, live skin - from bodies of young women she has murdered, that is. Now, it's a bit of a stretch, to say the least, that if you found you had an illness you would start bumping people off to cure it, but this was a horror movie and so as Kira ages in patches, she becomes a curious kind of youth vampire, feeding off the vitality of her victims in a stark metaphor for the cosmetic surgery industry. But there is only so much of the lead character skulking about and cutting off flesh from those she preys on, and after a while it was clear Keil and Stanley were running out of things to do with Kira. Fortunately, they dreamt up a conspiracy plot which may not have been original - we've seen menacing medical companies in countless horrors since the likes of Seconds in the sixties, after all - but was nicely played.

Almost stealing the movie was Lucie Aron, who essayed the role of the next-door neighbour Sophia, a flirty type who makes no secret of her interest in Kira and adds a necessary bounce to what could have been very doleful and sorry for itself. Her scenes were highlights, as were those with the doctor Kira sees, played by Barbara Crampton well into her career renaissance and proving her worth with an official-seeming persona that nevertheless generates unease: the doctor comes across as professional enough, yet why are we suspicious of her? Other than this being signalled as a horror movie from the outset, that was. If the investigation into humanity's, and specifically women's, dread of getting old didn't tell us anything we could not have worked out from watching your average health and beauty TV ad, to see it acted out with grim determination was quite bracing, and Forsythe (daughter of cult favourite heavy William Forsythe, though looking like Elizabeth Olsen here) skilfully provided a canvas for this meditation. That dreamlike atmosphere forgave a lot. Electro-music by Tom Batoy and Franco Tortora.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 60 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Who's the best?
Robin Askwith
Mark Wahlberg
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Ian Phillips
Jensen Breck
Enoch Sneed
Paul Smith
Stately Wayne Manor
Paul Shrimpton
  Vikki Sanderson
   

 

Last Updated: