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  We Go On They Call Him The SeekerBuy this film here.
Year: 2016
Director: Andy Mitton, Jesse Holland
Stars: Annette O'Toole, Clark Freeman, Giovanna Zacarías, Jay Dunn, Laura Heisler, John Glover, Justin Carpenter, Cassidy Freeman, Logan Kishi, Peter Lucas, Nicholas Popov, Steve Rifkin, Lucky Schwarz, Rachel Stamberg, Dig Wayne, Heather Wynters
Genre: Horror, Drama
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: Miles (Clark Freeman) has never been the same since his father died, and for example has found it impossible to drive a car, mostly thanks to the recurring nightmare he suffers where he is at the wheel and finds the steering locking, then the brakes fail, then the vehicle speeds up and then... he wakes with a start. His bereavement has got him thinking in other ways, however, specifically about what happens after death, if anything happens at all, and he concocts a plan to use his inheritance to pay for proof of an afterlife, just some evidence that there is something that occurs after we've left this world. He narrows the submissions he receives down to three, but his mother Charlotte (Annette O'Toole) warns him off this course of action...

The title would appear to be answer enough to Miles' dilemma, though you have to assume that as a character he won't know the title of the movie he is in, but writers and directors Andy Mitton and Jesse Holland were not about to blow their premise straight away, no matter what the three words were that we saw pop up at the beginning. This generated a degree of interest for reuniting three of the stars of popular and long-running superhero show Smallville, to whit: O'Toole who was Martha Kent, John Glover who was Lex Luthor's father, and Cassidy Freeman who was shady lady Tess Mercer, but there was more to it than a complacent bit of stunt casting.

That trio had proper roles to play, as Freeman was the sister of the leading man but played his mother in flashbacks, Glover was an academic who believed he had concocted a formula to see ghosts, and O'Toole had the largest part to play in her screen son's life. Indeed, she contributed quite a bit to the quality of the piece, as the story basically became a drama about a mother trying to help her damaged, adult son through a difficult time in his life, very far from the kind of relationship your more conventional horror would have concentrated on. They were not exactly a wisecracking double act, there were not really any jokes here, but they went some way to sustaining the viewer's interest.

So, no "gee, mom!" situations or the older lady embarrassing her offspring in cringe comedy set-ups, they had a sincere connection since they were both grieving for Miles' father, and that death was not all it seemed, either. O'Toole lifted what was rather visually bland aside from a few atmospheric shots into something more engaging as she was possibly the most interesting, certainly most level-headed, character in the film, a rock to anchor the more way out experiences that Miles undergoes in the second half where it all went a bit The Sixth Sense. So effective was she that you missed her when she wasn't on the screen, as Freeman was too doleful to be an attractive presence when spending time with him; not a bad performance by any means, just not given much to work with by the screenplay.

The fact that Charlotte's instincts were absolutely correct and Miles would have been better off putting the money to good use in this plane of existence and not worrying about the next was distinctly emphasised, not quite ignorance is bliss but more simply accept what you will never have any idea about, or you won't if you have any sense. The theme that some things were better left unexplored rose its head as they did with many a chiller, though this did not embrace its horror potential until the latter half when Miles has an experience that sets him off on a path to possible destruction, as if to say, well you did want to know what happens after you die, so now's your chance to find out first hand. In truth, the build-up was more satisfying than the pay-off as the ghosts we saw were more like zombies with a malevolent purpose, the mystery stronger than the solution, but that emotional, parental influence rendered it unusual enough to be worth sticking with till the conclusion. Moody music by Mitton.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

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