HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Werewolf
Little Monsters
Spider-Man: Far from Home
Horrible Histories: The Movie - Rotten Romans
Pentathlon
Anna
Moulin Rouge
Ray & Liz
African Queen, The
Helen Morgan Story, The
Golem, Der
Yentl
Finishing Line, The
Triple Threat
Mysterious Castle in the Carpathians, The
Driven
Planet of the Dinosaurs
Gwen
Big Breadwinner Hog
Thunder Road
Moby Dick
Frankenstein's Great Aunt Tillie
Mad Room, The
Phantom of the Megaplex
Night Sitter, The
Child's Play
Power, The
Midsommar
After Midnight
Dolemite is My Name
Varda by Agnes
Toy Story 4
Master Z: Ip Man Legacy
Man Who Never Was, The
Greener Grass
Scobie Malone
Gangster, the Cop, the Devil, The
Brightburn
Satanic Panic
Claudine
   
 
Newest Articles
Cleesed Off: Clockwise on Blu-ray
Sorry I Missed You: Les Demoiselles de Rochefort on Blu-ray
Silliest of the Silly: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 1 on Blu-ray
Protest Songs: Hair on Blu-ray
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
Battle of the Skeksis: The Dark Crystal Now and Then
American Madness: Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor and The Naked Kiss on Blu-ray
Flight of the Navigator and the 80s Futurekids
Trains and Training: The British Transport Films Collection Volume 13 on DVD
Holiday from Hell: In Bruges on Blu-ray
The Comedy Stylings of Kurt Russell: Used Cars and Captain Ron
   
 
  Same Time, Next Year The love of your lifeBuy this film here.
Year: 1978
Director: Robert Mulligan
Stars: Ellen Burstyn, Alan Alda, Ivan Bonar
Genre: Comedy, Drama
Rating:  0 Votes
Review: Apparently this film is hated by some and loved by others – there are no in-betweens. I fall into the 'love' camp. It is romantic, moving, and funny, and a potentially distasteful situation is made palatable by the fact that the characters are well drawn and not everything in the garden is rosy.

The situation is this: in 1951 a young couple, George (Alan Alda) and Doris (Ellen Burstyn) find themselves in the same small hotel on the California coast somewhere north of San Francisco. He is an accountant who does an old friend a favour by checking his books while taking a short holiday, she is a housewife travelling to her annual religious retreat in a convent. Dining separately, they are taken with each other, and begin to chat. The next morning they wake up in bed together, after a night of highly satisfactory love making.

Discussing what they have done and the possible consequences, it becomes obvious to both this is more than just a one-night fling, but while they have genuine feelings for each other, they also have existing marital and family commitments (both are married with children). Their solution is to meet for the weekend each year at the same time when their spouses expect them to be away from home. (A similar situation was explored to more farcical comic effect in Billy Wilder's Avanti in 1972). For the next two-and-a-half decades we follow the couple through slices of their lives, in 1956, 1961, 1966, 1972 and finally 1977, from their mid-late 20's to their early-mid 50's.

During these years the film covers everything life can throw at you, from birth to death and all points in between, including career developments and the way our attitudes and beliefs change over time. I don't want to plant spoilers here. If you haven't seen the film it would be wrong to be able to anticipate plot points, you have to see this film and its characters unfold for you.

Alda and Burstyn do an excellent job of making their roles, and their development, credible. From being a love-struck young man, Alda becomes serious, reflective, someone who has become wiser with experience (although the phrase “OK, maybe I didn't handle that well” recurs throughout his life), while Burstyn changes from housewife to hippie to educated, successful businesswoman and finally conformist grandmother. If anything the 'hippie' phase is a bit of a stretch as Doris should now be getting on for 40, but it does make the 1966 episode more dramatic and poignant. Both performances are Oscar-worthy (Burstyn was nominated but lost to Jane Fonda for Coming Home, but won a Best Actress Golden Globe, Alda was nominated for a Golden Globe but lost to Warren Beatty for Heaven Can Wait).

The sticking point for some viewers is whether it is right to celebrate a quarter century of infidelity, and could this happen? Could two people, who are supposed to be in love with each other, be content to meet for two days a year and stay married to long-term partners? Aren't they just selfish, self-indulgent hypocrites? The trick of the film is to show they are loving, caring people who actually make a sacrifice by limiting their relationship on these terms. They could have dumped husband/wife and family to run away and be happy together for 26 years, but recognised their responsibilities to others and didn't make that choice. At one point Alda actively intervenes to save Doris's marriage.

Ultimately the film says that while circumstances change, opinions change, and even our appearance changes with age and fashions, we all do have a soulmate to whom we can devote ourselves and love and support wholeheartedly. In my book, that's not a bad message, given the world we live in.
Reviewer: Enoch Sneed

 

This review has been viewed 1317 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Enoch Sneed
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
  Rachel Franke
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: