HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Harpoon
Great Northfield Minnesota Raid, The
Dark Phoenix
No Mercy
Arctic
Fate of Lee Khan, The
El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie
Ladyworld
Rocketman
Kid Who Would Be King, The
Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound
America America
Darkest Minds, The
Along Came Jones
Hummingbird Project, The
Under the Table You Must Go
Harry Birrell Presents Films of Love and War
Hanging Tree, The
Godzilla: King of the Monsters
Scooby-Doo! Camp Scare
Itsy Bitsy
Witchmaker, The
Prey, The
If It's Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium
Happy Death Day 2U
Full Moon High
Strange But True
Kamikaze 1989
Never Grow Old
Time of Your Life, The
Mountain Men, The
Epic
Best Before Death
John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum
Isabelle
Non-Stop New York
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood
Oblomov
Alita: Battle Angel
We the Animals
   
 
Newest Articles
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
Battle of the Skeksis: The Dark Crystal Now and Then
American Madness: Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor and The Naked Kiss on Blu-ray
Flight of the Navigator and the 80s Futurekids
Trains and Training: The British Transport Films Collection Volume 13 on DVD
Holiday from Hell: In Bruges on Blu-ray
The Comedy Stylings of Kurt Russell: Used Cars and Captain Ron
Robot Rocked: The Avengers Cybernauts Trilogy on Blu-ray
Hammer's Bloodthirsty Bad Girls 1970: Lust for a Vampire and Countess Dracula
Hammer to Fall: Kiss Me Deadly on Blu-ray
Home of the Grave: The House That Dripped Blood and Asylum on Blu-ray
   
 
  Jurassic World Technical DifficultiesBuy this film here.
Year: 2015
Director: Colin Trevorrow
Stars: Chris Pratt, Bryce Dallas Howard, Irrfan Khan, Vincent D'Onofrio, Ty Simpkins, Nick Robinson, Jake Johnson, Omar Sy, BD Wong, Judy Greer, Lauren Lapkus, Brian Tee, Katie McGrath, Andy Buckley, Eric Edelstein, Jimmy Fallon
Genre: Action, Science Fiction, Adventure
Rating:  7 (from 2 votes)
Review: Twenty years ago, there was a mishap at the Jurassic Park holiday destination where the exhibits ran riot before it was even properly open to the public. Those exhibits were a certain type of animal, specifically dinosaurs genetically created in the lab to walk the Earth once again after sixty-five million years, or at least walk the island they were born on, but now they have been managed and have become a very respectable theme park where tourists can witness various fearsome beasts put on a show for them, or get up close to the more docile herbivores – heck, you can even ride them should you so desire. But maybe the whole dinosaur theme park idea has grown passé, and something more exciting is in order…

In the years between the first trilogy of Jurassic Park movies being made and a new cycle starting up, quite a few things had changed – the World Trade Center was still standing when the third instalment was released, for example – but as far as entertainment went, the tyranny of the awesome was in full effect. That was, the drive to make each blockbuster movie more spectacular than the last, and so doing make the audience gape as in a populist Steven Spielberg work with the desired exclamation “Awesome!” This was not lost on the makers of the long-gestating fourth entry, to the extent that it formed the impetus behind the plot, therefore just as Baccara’s disco classic Yes Sir, I Can Boogie was more or less a song about singing the song itself, Jurassic World was a film about the trials of putting together Jurassic World.

One other significant thing in the movie sphere had happened in that interim, which was the release of the pro-animal rights documentary Blackfish, telling the story of how the whales and dolphins in Sea World aquatic theme parks were actually being forced into very unnatural behaviour for the entertainment of the public, to the extent that the owners could have been charged with animal cruelty and putting people’s lives at risk. The outrage that followed apparently fed into the writing of Jurassic World, which let’s not forget was co-penned (with director Colin Trevorrow and Derek Connolly) by the husband and wife team who created the most pro-animal rights blockbuster of then-recent times, Rise of the Planet of the Apes, so you could perceive a definite sympathy with the beasts who are left behind bars (or in tanks) for the diversion of tourists.

The big idea was that this sequel was the equivalent of the genetically engineered dinosaur that becomes such a menace when it escapes, a creature designed to provoke the awesome factor in viewers without asking at what cost this endless desire for the incredible could arrive at. Naturally, there was a heavy degree of the movie having its cake and eating it too, so the huge computer effects budget went on recreating the dinos we had seen before as well as a few we hadn’t, all the while emphasising how amazing this was to be witnessing (never mind that Stan Winston’s effects in the first instalment remained the benchmark of convincing dinosaurs on film that this did not quite match). Starting with a generous nod to Willis O’Brien’s pioneering stop motion endeavours, there was also something else this had on its mind.

Which was the influence this was having on children, as we were introduced to two brothers (Ty Simpkins and Nick Robinson) who visit the island to see their aunt Claire (Bryce Dallas Howard), an administrator there who has no time for her sister’s kids, and is content to have a staff member babysit them around the park while she gets on with the business of making money. So already we see the runners of the establishment have the wrong interests at heart – baddie Vincent D'Onofrio wishes to use the lizards for military purposes – which introduces the hero, velociraptor whisperer Owen, played by man of the moment Chris Pratt. He is down with the beasts and understands they must be looked after with care, and are not necessarily meant to be attractions, never mind playthings for children (perhaps a nod to the reaction Jurassic Park had that it was too scary for the younglings). Fair enough, there then followed all the setpieces of dino action you’d expect, nicely arranged if unsurprising, but there was room for contemplating, say, that parenthood wasn’t the worst thing to aspire to, that being blind to consequences isn’t good, and rampant commercialism can be detrimental, though it might not physically eat you. Music by Michael Giacchino.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1693 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (2)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
Andrew Pragasam
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: